NETRESEC Network Security Blog - Tag : Capture

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PCAP or it didn't happen

The phrase "PCAP or it didn't happen" is often used in the network security field when someone want proof that an attack or compromise has taken place. One such example is the recent OpenSSL heartbleed vulnerability, where some claim that the vulnerability was known and exploited even before it was discovered by Google's Neel Mehta and Codenomicon.

PCAP or it didn't happen pwnie, original by Nina on http://n924.deviantart.com
Image: PCAP or it didn't happen pwnie, original by Nina

After the Heartbleed security advisory was published, EFF tweeted:

"Anyone reproduced observations of #Heartbleed attacks from 2013?"
and Liam Randall (of Bro fame) tweeted:
"If someone finds historical exploits of #Heartbleed I hope they can report it. Lot's of sites mining now."

Liam Randall (@Hectaman) tweeting about historical Heartbleed searches Heartbleed

It is unfortunately not possible to identify Heartbleed attacks by analyzing log files, as stated by the following Q&A from the heartbleed.com website:

Can I detect if someone has exploited this against me?

Exploitation of this bug does not leave any trace of anything abnormal happening to the logs.

Additionally, IDS  signatures  for detecting the Heartbleed attacks weren't available until after implementations of the exploit code were being actively used in the wild.

Hence, the only reliable way of detecting early heartbleed attacks (i.e. prior to April 7) is to analyze old captured network traffic from before April 7. In order to do this you should have had a full packet capture running, which was configured to capture and store all your traffic. Unfortunately many companies and organizations haven't yet realized the value that historical packet captures can provide.

Why Full Packet Capture Matters

Some argue that just storing netflow data is enough in order to do incident response. However, detecting events like the heartbleed attack is impossible to do with netflow since you need to verify the contents of the network traffic.

Not only is retaining historical full packet captures useful in order to detect attacks that have taken place in the past, it is also extremely valuable to have in order to do any of the following:

  • IDS Verification
    Investigate IDS alerts to see if they were false positives or real attacks.

  • Post Exploitation Analysis
    Analyze network traffic from a compromise to see what the attacker did after hacking into a system.

  • Exfiltration Analysis
    Assess what intellectual property that has been exfiltrated by an external attacker or insider.

  • Network Forensics
    Perform forensic analysis of a suspect's network traffic by extracting files, emails, chat messages, images etc.

Setting up a Full Packet Capture

netsniff-ng logo

The first step, when deploying a full packet capture (FPC) solution, is to install a network tap or configure a monitor port in order to get a copy of all packets going in and out from your networks. Then simply sniff the network traffic with a tool like dumpcap or netsniff-ng. Another alternative is to deploy a whole network security monitoring (NSM) infrastructure, preferably by installing the SecurityOnion Linux distro.

A network sniffer will eventually run out of disk, unless captured network traffic is written to disk in a rung buffer manner (use "-b files" switch in dumpcap) or there is a scheduled job in place to remove the oldest capture files. SecurityOnion, for example, normally runs its "cleandisk" cronjob when disk utilization reaches 90%.

The ratio between disk space and utilized bandwidth becomes the maximum retention period for full packet data. We recommend having a full packet capture retention period of at least 7 days, but many companies and organizations are able to store several month's worth of network traffic (disk is cheap).

Big Data PCAP Analysis

Okay, you've got a PCAP store with multiple terabytes of data. Then what? How do you go about analyzing such large volumes of captured full content network traffic? Well, tasks like indexing and analyzing PCAP data are complex matters than are beyond the scope of this blog post. We've covered the big data PCAP analysis topic in previous  blog posts, and there is more to come. However, capturing the packets to disk is a crucial first step in order to utilize the powers of network forensics. Or as the saying goes “PCAP or it didn't happen”.

Posted by Erik Hjelmvik on Thursday, 01 May 2014 21:45:00 (UTC/GMT)

Tags: #capture#sniffer#IDS#forensics

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CapLoader 1.1 Released

CapLoader Logo Version 1.1 of the super-fast PCAP parsing tool CapLoader is being released today. CapLoader is the ideal tool for digging through large volumes of PCAP files. Datasets in the GB and even TB order can be loaded into CapLoader to produce a clear view of all TCP and UDP flows. CapLoader also provides instantaneous access to the raw packets of each flow, which makes it a perfect preloader tool in order to select and export interesting data to other tools like NetworkMiner or Wireshark.

Drag-and-Drop PCAP from CapLoader to Wireshark
Five flows being extracted from Honeynet.org's SOTM 28 to Wireshark with CapLoader

New functionality in version 1.1

New features in version 1.1 of CapLoader are:

  • PcapNG support
  • Fast transcript of TCP and UDP flows (similar to Wireshark's ”Follow TCP Stream”)
  • Better port agnostic protocol identification; more protocols and better precision (over 100 protocols and sub-protocols can now be identified, including Skype and the C&C protocol of Poison Ivy RAT)
  • A “Hosts” tab containing a list of all transmitting hosts and information about open ports, operating system as well as Geo-IP localization (using GeoLite data created by MaxMind)
  • Gzip compressed capture files can be opened directly with CapLoader
  • Pcap files can be loaded directly from an URL

CapLoader Flow Transcript aka Follow TCP Stream
Flow transcript of Honeynet SOTM 28 pcap file day3.log

Free Trial Version

Another thing that is completely new with version 1.1 of CapLoader is that we now provide a free trial version for download. The CapLoader trial is free to use for anyone and we don't even require trial users to register their email addresses when downloading the software.

There are, of course, a few limitations in the trial version; such as no protocol identification, OS fingerprinting or GeoIP localization. There is also a limit as to how many gigabyte of data that can be loaded with the CapLoader trial at a time. This size limit is 500 GB, which should by far exceed what can be loaded with competing commercial software like Cascade Pilot and NetWitness Investigator.

The professional edition of CapLoader doesn't have any max PCAP limit whatsoever, which allows for terabytes of capture files to be loaded.

CapLoader with TCP and UDP flows view
CapLoader's Flows view showing TCP and UDP flows

CapLoader with Hosts view
CapLoader's Hosts view showing identified hosts on the network

Getting CapLoader

The trial version of CapLoader can be downloaded from the CapLoader product page. The professional edition of CapLoader can be bought at our Purchase CapLoader page.

CapLoader USB flash drive
The CapLoader USB flash drive

Customers who have previously bought CapLoader 1.0 can upgrade to version 1.1 by downloading an update from our customer portal.

For more information about CapLoader please see our previous blog post Fast analysis of large pcap files with CapLoader

Posted by Erik Hjelmvik on Monday, 21 January 2013 11:45:00 (UTC/GMT)

Tags: #CapLoader#PcapNG#PCAP#GB#gigabyte#capture#flow#transcript#gzip#free

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