NETRESEC Network Security Blog


CapLoader 1.8 Released

CapLoader 1.8

We are happy to announce the release of CapLoader 1.8 today!

CapLoader is primarily used to filter, slice and dice large PCAP datasets into smaller ones. This new version contains several new features that improves this filtering functionality even further. To start with, the “Keyword Filter” can now be used to filter the rows in the Flows, Services or Hosts tabs using regular expressions. This enables the use of matching expressions like this:

  • amazon|akamai|cdn
    Show only rows containing any of the strings “amazon” “akamai” or “cdn”.
  • microsoft\.com\b|windowsupdate\.com\b
    Show only servers with domain names ending in “microsoft.com” or “windowsupdate.com”.
  • ^SMB2?$
    Show only SMB and SMB2 flows.
  • \d{1,3}\.\d{1,3}\.\d{1,3}\.255$
    Show only IPv4 address ending with “.255”.

For a reference on the full regular expression syntax available in CapLoader, please see Microsoft’s regex “Quick Reference”.

One popular workflow supported by CapLoader is to divide all flows (or hosts) into two separate datasets, for example one “normal” and one “malicious” set. The user can move rows between these two sets, where only one set is visible while the rows in the other set are hidden. To switch which dataset that is visible versus hidden the user needs to click the [Invert Hiding] button (or use the [Ctrl]+[Tab] key combination). With this new release we’ve also made the “Invert Hiding” functionality available by clicking the purple bar, which shows the number of rows present in the currently viewed set.

CapLoader Invert Hiding GIF

Readers with a keen eye might also notice that the purple bar charts are now also accompanied by a number, indicating how many rows that are visible after each filter is applied. The available filters are: Set Selection, BPF and Keyword Filter.

NetFlow + DNS = Great Success!

CapLoader’s main view presents the contents of the loaded PCAP files as a list of netflow records. Since the full PCAP is available, CapLoader also parses the DNS packets in the capture files in order to enrich the netflow view with hostnames. Recently PaC shared a great idea with us, why not show how many failed DNS lookups each client does? This would enable generic detection of DGA botnets without using blacklists. I’m happy to announce that this great idea made it directly into this new release! The rightmost column in CapLoader’s hosts tab, called “DNS_Fails”, shows how many percent of a client’s DNS requests that have resulted in an NXRESPONSE or SRVFAIL response.

CapLoader 1.8

Two packet capture files are loaded into CapLoader in the screenshot above; one PCAP file from a PC infected with the Shifu malware and one PCAP file with “normal traffic” (thanks @StratosphereIPS for sharing these capture files). As you can see, one of the clients (10.0.2.107) has a really high DNS failure ratio (99.81%). Unsurprisingly, this is also the host that was infected with the Shifu, which uses a domain generation algorithm (DGA) to locate its C2 servers.

Apart from parsing A and CNAME records from DNS responses CapLoader now also parses AAAA DNS records (IPv6 addresses). This enables CapLoader to map public domain names to hosts with IPv6 addresses.

Additional Updates

The new CapLoader release also comes with several other new features and updates, such as:

  • Added urlscan.io service for domain and IP lookups (right-click a flow or host to bring up the lookup menu).
  • Flow ID coloring based on 5-tuple, and clearer colors in timeline Gantt chart.
  • Extended default flow-timeout from 10 minutes to 2 hours for TCP flows.
  • Changed flow-timout for non-TCP flows to 60 seconds.
  • Upgraded to .NET Framework 4.7.2.

Updating to the Latest Release

Users who have previously purchased a license for CapLoader can download a free update to version 1.8 from our customer portal. All others can download a free 30 day trial from the CapLoader product page (no registration required).

Credits

We’d like to thank Mikael Harmark, Mandy van Oosterhout and Ulf Holmström for reporting bugs that have been fixed in this release. We’d also like to thank PaC for the DNS failure rate feature request mentioned in this blog post.

Posted by Erik Hjelmvik on Tuesday, 28 May 2019 10:45:00 (UTC/GMT)

Tags: #CapLoader #NetFlow #regex #DNS #DGA #Stratosphere

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Video: TrickBot and ETERNALCHAMPION

This video tutorial is a walkthrough of how you can analyze the PCAP file UISGCON-traffic-analysis-task-pcap-2-of-2.pcap (created by Brad Duncan). The capture file contains a malicious Word Document (macro downloader), Emotet (banking trojan), TrickBot/Trickster (banking trojan) and an EternalChampion (CVE-2017-0146) exploit used to perform lateral movement.

Network Diagram

Network Diagram

Timeline of Events

Frame Time (UTC) Event
825 18:55:32 Malicious Word doc [cosmoservicios.cl]
1099 18:56:04 Emotet download [bsrcellular.com]
5024 19:00:41 Trickbot "radiance.png" download
9604 19:01:34 Client credentials exfiltrated [200.29.24.36:8082]
9915 19:01:36 ETERNALCHAMPION exploit from client to DC
10424 19:01:51 Client sends .EXE files to \\10.1.75.4\C$\WINDOWS\
11078 19:01:51 Client infects DC with Trickbot via rogue service
14314 19:07:03 DC credentials exfiltrated [200.29.24.36:8082]

OSINT Links Opened

Tools Used

Network Forensics Training

Wanna improve your network forensics skills? Take a look at our trainings, the next scheduled class is on March 18-19 at the TROOPERS conference in Germany.

Posted by Erik Hjelmvik on Wednesday, 23 January 2019 14:00:00 (UTC/GMT)

Tags: #Wireshark #CapLoader #NetworkMiner #videotutorial #video #pcap #Network Forensics

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NetworkMiner 2.4 Released

NetworkMiner 2.4

We are proud to announce the release of NetworkMiner 2.4 today! The new version comes with several improvements, such as username extraction from Kerberos traffic, better OS fingerprinting and even better Linux support.


Protocol Updates

The Kerberos v5 implementation in NetworkMiner 2.4 can be used to to extract usernames, hostnames and realms (domains) from unencrypted Kerberos requests/responses on port 88. NetworkMiner also parses and extracts usernames etc. from HTTP auth headers and SMB security blobs when they use Kerberos for authentication.

Kerberos username (Administrator) and realm (DENYDC.COM) in NetworkMiner's Host tab
Image: NetworkMiner showing extracted username (Administrator) and realm (DENYDC.COM) from the Wireshark sample capture file “Krb-contrained-delegation.cap”.

NetworkMiner also automatically attempts to parse traffic to TCP port 11371 as HTTP in order to extract GPG keys sent using the HKP protocol.


MAC Address Magic

We’ve added two new features related to MAC addresses to this release. One of them is the “MAC Age” field (showing “2000-11-09” in the previous screenshot), which is a guesstimate of how hold a device/host is based on its MAC address. This functionality uses HD Moore’s mac-ages database, which contains approximate dates for when hardware address ranges were allocated by IEEE (original concept from DeepMac).

The second MAC feature is a simple yet useful feature that adds links between hosts that share the same MAC address. This feature is useful for linking a host's IPv6 and IPv4 addresses with each other, but it can also be used to track if a physical host has changed its IP address. The MAC address links can be accessed by expanding the MAC address node in NetworkMiner’s Hosts tab.

IPv4 and IPv6 address with the same MAC address
Image: NetworkMiner with a PCAP file from ISTS 2012

ICS Asset Inventory

Hard Hat

We’ve put in some ground work in order to create OS fingerprinting signatures for several Industrial Control System (ICS) devices. Our signatures have been submitted and merged into Eric Kollmann’s Satori TCP database, which NetworkMiner uses to passively fingerprint hosts by examining various TCP and IP fields in the initial SYN/SYN+ACK packets of TCP sessions. The ICS devices we’ve added include PLCs, RTUs as well as rugged network equipment from vendors like ABB, Allen-Bradley, Modicon, Moxa, Phoenix Contact and Siemens. Some ICS vendors even got an icon showing their logo in the Hosts tab (see the Siemens/RUGGEDCOM device in the screenshot below) while the others got a yellow hard hat.

Asset inventory list with ICS devices
Image: Asset inventory list generated by NetworkMiner using PCAP files from the 4SICS 2015 ICS Lab.

EternalBlue

NetworkMiner isn’t designed to be used as an IDS. Nevertheless we decided to add detection for the EternalBlue exploit to NetworkMiner 2.4. The fact that NetworkMiner parses NetBIOS and SMB makes it pretty straightforward to identify when an attacker is attempting to allocate a large non-paged pool in srvnet.sys by using a vulnerability in Microsoft’s SMB implementation (see MS17-010 for reference). This type of detection is difficult to perform using a standard IDS solution that cannot parse the NetBIOS and SMB protocols. Detected EternalBlue exploit attempts are listed in NetworkMiner's “Anomalies” tab. Example PCAP files with attackers/malware using the EternalBlue exploit can be found here:


NetworkMiner in Linux

NetworkMiner Loves Linux

NetworkMiner is a Windows tool, but it actually runs just fine also in other operating systems with help of the Mono Framework (see our guide “HowTo install NetworkMiner in Ubuntu Fedora and Arch Linux”). However, there are a few pitfalls that must be avoided to get the software running smoothly using Mono. With this release we’ve implemented workarounds for two bugs in Mono’s GUI implementation (System.Windows.Forms).

The first workaround handles a Mono bug that sometimes could be triggered by Drag-and-Dropping a file or image from NetworkMiner to another application, such as a browser, text editor or image viewer. Doing so would previously trigger a NullReferenceException in System.Windows.Forms.X11Dnd+TextConverter.SetData under certain conditions. We’re happy to report that you can now reliably drag and drop files extracted by NetworkMiner to other tools, even when running Linux.

The second workaround handles a bug in Mono’s GDIPlus implementation related to rendering of Unicode characters. We were unfortunately not able to reliably get Mono to render Unicode characters, NetworkMiner will therefore convert all Unicode MIME data to ASCII when using Mono (typically in Linux). Windows users will still get the proper Unicode representations of exotic characters and emojis in NetworkMiner though. ☺


NetworkMiner Professional

The commercial version of NetworkMiner, i.e. NetworkMiner Professional, comes with a few additional improvements. One of them is is that the following additional online sources have been added to the OSINT lookup feature:

OSINT lookup of file hash in NetworkMiner Professional
Image: OSINT lookup menu for .exe file extracted from Malware-Traffic-Analysis.net’s 2018-10-16-trickbot.pcap.

The CSV export from NetworkMinerCLI has been updated to use the ISO 8601 format with explicit time zone for timestamps. An exported timestamp now look something like this:

2019-01-08T13:37:00.4711000+02:00

NetworkMiner Professional 2.4 also identifies application layer protocols regardless of port number (a.k.a. PIPI) with much better precision than earlier versions. It also extracts audio from VoIP calls (SIP) more reliably than before.


Credits

I would like to thank Chris Sistrunk for requesting GUI support to link IPv4 and IPv6 hosts with the same MAC address and Jonas Lejon for the HKP GPG key extraction idea. I would also like to thank Phil Hagen for notifying us about the issue with Unicode in emails when running NetworkMiner under Mono and Ahmad Nawawi for notifying us about the protocol identification shortages in the previous version.


Upgrading to Version 2.4

Users who have purchased a license for NetworkMiner Professional 2.x can download a free update to version 2.4 from our customer portal. Those who instead prefer to use the free and open source version can grab the latest version of NetworkMiner from the official NetworkMiner page.

⛏ FOR GREAT JUSTICE! ⛏

Posted by Erik Hjelmvik on Thursday, 10 January 2019 14:20:00 (UTC/GMT)

Tags: #NetworkMiner #ICS #SIP #VoIP #IPv6 #Mono #Linux #Satori #OSINT #PIPI

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TorPCAP - Tor Network Forensics

PcapTor

Unencrypted network traffic, destined for the Tor network, is sent between localhost TCP sockets on computers running Tor clients, such as the Tor Browser. In this blog post I show how anonymous Tor browsing can be visualized, by loading a PCAP file with localhost traffic into NetworkMiner. We call this technique TorPCAP.

Tor is a secure platform that enables users to browse the web anonymously. The Tor Project website describes the tool as:

“Tor is free software and an open network that helps you defend against traffic analysis”

It is also possible to host anonymous “onion services” on the Dark Web using Tor:

“Tor makes it possible for users to hide their locations while offering various kinds of services, such as web publishing or an instant messaging server. Using Tor "rendezvous points," other Tor users can connect to these onion services, formerly known as hidden services, each without knowing the other's network identity.”

Capturing Tor Traffic Before it gets Encrypted

Tor installations include a SOCKS proxy listening on TCP port 9150 on localhost (127.0.0.1). This local SOCKS proxy is used by the Tor Browser, which connects to the proxy in order to have its traffic encrypted and forwarded to the Tor network. This means that by sniffing traffic on localhost it’s actually possible to create a solid forensic trail of all traffic a PC sends to and from the Tor network.

Tor Browser and SOCKS

You can use tcpdump to capture the localhost traffic on PCs running the Tails OS or Tor Browser in MacOS or Linux. If you’re running the Tor Browser in Windows, then we recommend using RawCap to sniff the localhost traffic (RawCap is a portable standalone tool that doesn’t need WinPcap or NDIS drivers to work).

In order to make sense of the captured traffic you need a tool that can parse the SOCKS protocol (RFC 1928). NetworkMiner includes a SOCKS parser since version 2.1, which can be used to extract and reassemble data going to and from the Tor network.


   Image Credit: Ken Edge    Eldon by @kenedgeiscool

Demo: Analysing TorPCAP Network Traffic

A user, let’s call him “Eldon”, used Tor for some dark-web activity on November 30, 2018. Eldon was using the Tor Browser on a Windows PC and RawCap was used to capture the localhost network traffic from Eldon’s computer. A PCAP file with the captured packets from Eldon’s PC can be accessed here. Please feel free to open this capture file with NetworkMiner, in order to follow along in this analysis.


File   : rawcap-localhost-tor.pcap
Size   : 1.47 MB
SHA256 : 9134FA542B388498C2A58A2E1424FCD4AF466CE7117DBE9AAFD0A031CC8209B8


The “Files” tab in NetworkMiner contains a list of all files that have been reassembled from the analyzed PCAP file. This file listing reveals that Eldon used the “not Evil” search engine (hss3uro2hsxfogfq[.]onion) to search for “buy fake passports” in frame 1136.

NetworkMiner's Files tab with not Evil search

The search result page from not Evil has been reassemled by NetworkMiner as “index.php.CB66877E.html”. By opening this HTML document in a browser we can see which search results Eldon got (no Internet connection is needed to open the reassembled html).

not Evil search in Tor

The “Browsers” tab in NetworkMiner Professional shows that Eldon followed the link for entry #2 in his search results (BUY FAKE PASSPORTS [...]), leading him to the “fakeimz[...].onion” website.

HTML document in Edge reassembled by NetworkMiner

Eldon then proceeded to list the available passports (see the reassembled file “novelty_fake_id_samples.shtml” in frame 1837) and chose the UK passport (“pp-uk-open-big.jpg”).

novelty_fake_id_samples.shtml NetworkMiner Professional Images tab with pp-uk-open-big.jpg

As Eldon proceeded he got a price list for the fake passports offered at this site (“novelty_fake_id_pricing.shtml”), but we don’t see any evidence of him actually completing a purchase of a fake UK passport.

HTML file reassembled by NetworkMiner opened in Edge browser

If we go back to the Images tab in NetworkMiner, and scroll a bit further down we see a picture of a gun. Let’s see where it comes from.

NetworkMiner Images tab with gun pic

It turns out Eldon also searched for “buy guns for bitcoin UK”. You can list all search engine queries by looking for entries in the “Parameters” tab with parameter name “q”. This technique is applicable for the “not Evil” search engine as well as most clearnet search engines, like Google, Bing, Yahoo! and DuckDuckGo (disregarding the fact that they use TLS).

NetworkMiner Parameters tab with web searches

The Browsers tab shows us that Eldon clicked on a link to the “UK Guns and Ammo Store” (tuu66[...].onion).

not Evil search in NetworkMiner Professional Browsers tab

This website has also been passively reassembled by NetworkMiner and can be opened offline in a browser (see “index[2].html”).

UK Guns and Ammo Store (dark web)

The Credentials tab in NetworkMiner shows the username and password used by Eldon to log into the website:

Credentials tab in NetworkMiner Professional 2.3.1 showing username and password sent over Tor to an onion service

After logging in, Eldon puts two items in his shopping cart (see “cart.php[1].html”), but gets a message saying “Not enough balance for this order” when clicking the “Continue to Checkout” link. It seems Eldon’s account at the dark-web weapons store doesn’t have any Bitcoins (see “wallet.php.html”)

UK Guns and Ammo Store - Shopping Cart (dark web) UK Guns and Ammo Store - Bitcoin Wallet (dark web)

Side Note - Web Trackers and Tor

It is considered bad practice to use clear-net tracking services, like Google Analytics, to track users visiting an onion service. However, we noticed that the fake passports website uses a Google Analytics script with tracking ID “UA-19359933-1”.

Dark Web HTML with Googla Analytics ID UA-19359933-1

Googling this ID led us to this very similar website:
hxxp://www.buypassportsfake[.]cc

hxxp://www.buypassportsfake[.]cc

Posted by Leon Kowalski on Wednesday, 12 December 2018 09:33:00 (UTC/GMT)

Tags: #PCAP #NetworkMiner #RawCap #SOCKS

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book

Recommended Books

» The Practice of Network Security Monitoring, Richard Bejtlich (2013)

» Applied Network Security Monitoring, Chris Sanders and Jason Smith (2013)

» Network Forensics, Sherri Davidoff and Jonathan Ham (2012)

» The Tao of Network Security Monitoring, Richard Bejtlich (2004)

» Practical Packet Analysis, Chris Sanders (2017)

» Windows Forensic Analysis, Harlan Carvey (2009)

» TCP/IP Illustrated, Volume 1, Kevin Fall and Richard Stevens (2011)

» Industrial Network Security, Eric D. Knapp and Joel Langill (2014)