NETRESEC Network Security Blog - Tag : network

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Zyklon Malware Network Forensics Video Tutorial

We are releasing a series of network forensics video tutorials throughout the next few weeks. First up is this analysis of a PCAP file containing network traffic from the "Zyklon H.T.T.P." malware.

Analyzing a Zyklon Trojan with Suricata and NetworkMiner

Resources
https://www.malware-traffic-analysis.net/2017/07/22/index.html
https://github.com/Security-Onion-Solutions/security-onion
https://www.arbornetworks.com/blog/asert/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/zyklon_season.pdf
http://doc.emergingthreats.net/2017930

IOCs
service.tellepizza.com
104.18.40.172
104.18.41.172
Mozilla/5.0 (Windows; U; Windows NT 5.1; en-US; rv:1.8.1.3pre) Gecko/20070302 BonEcho/2.0.0.3pre
gate.php
.onion
98:1F:D2:FF:DC:16:B2:30:1F:11:70:82:3D:2E:A5:DC
65:8A:5C:76:98:A9:1D:66:B4:CB:9D:43:5C:DE:AD:22:38:37:F3:9C
E2:50:35:81:9F:D5:30:E1:CE:09:5D:9F:64:75:15:0F:91:16:12:02:2F:AF:DE:08:4A:A3:5F:E6:5B:88:37:D6

Posted by Erik Hjelmvik on Monday, 05 February 2018 07:30:00 (UTC/GMT)

Tags: #Netresec​ #PCAP​ #Trojan​ #video​ #tutorial​ #videotutorial​ #NetworkMiner​ #SecurityOnion​ #Suricata​ #malware​ #network​ #forensics​ #NSM​ #malware_traffic​

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Keyword Search in PCAP files

Sherlock Holmes and Magnifying Glass via Inside Croydon A new function in the free version of CapLoader 1.2 is the "Find Keyword" feature. This keyword search functionality makes it possible to seek large capture files for a string or byte pattern super fast!

You might say, so what? PCAP string search can already be done with tools like tcpflow, ngrep and even Wireshark; what's the benefit of adding yet another tool to this list? One benefit is that CapLoader doesn't just give you the packet or content that matched the keyword, it will instead extract the whole TCP or UDP flow that contained the match. CapLoader also supports many different encodings, which is demonstrated in this blog post.

Here are a few quick wins with CapLoader's keyword search feature:

  • Track User-Agent - Search for a specific user agent string to extract all the HTTP traffic from a particular browser or malware.
  • Track Domain Name - Search for a particular domain name to get all DNS lookups as well as web traffic relating to that domain (including HTTP "referer" field matches).
  • Extract Messages - Search for a keyword in e-mail or chat traffic to get the whole e-mail or conversation, not just the single packet that matched.
  • Extract Files - Search for a unique string or byte sequence in a file (such as a piece of malware) to enable extraction of the complete file transfer.

EXAMPLE: DigitalCorpora M57

As an example, let's search the digital corpora file net-2009-12-06-11:59.pcap (149 MB) for the keyword "immortal". Follow these steps in order to veify our analysis using the free edition of CapLoader.

  1. Start CapLoader and select File -> Open URL, enter:
    http://digitalcorpora.org/corp/nps/scenarios/2009-m57-patents/net/net-2009-12-06-11:59.pcap.gz
  2. Edit -> Find Keyword (or Ctrl+F), enter "immortal" CapLoader Find Keyword Form
  3. Click the "Find and Select All Matching Flows" button
  4. One TCP flow is now selected (Flow_ID 5469, 192.168.1.104:2592 -> 192.168.1.1:25) CapLoader with one selected flow
  5. Right click the selected flow (ID 5469) and select "Flow Transcript"
CapLoader Flow Transcript of SMTP email attachment

CapLoader transcript of SMTP email flow

Looks as if an email has been sent with an attachment named "microscope1.jpg". However, the string "immortal" cannot be seen anywhere in the transcript view. The match that CapLoader found was actually in the contents of the attachment, which has been base64 encoded in the SMTP transfer in accordance with RFC 2045 (MIME).

The email attachment can easily be extracted from the PCAP file using NetworkMiner. However, to keep things transparent, let's just do a simple manual verification of the matched data. The first three lines of the email attachment are:

/9j/4AAQSkZJRgABAQEAkACQAAD/2wBDAAEBAQEBAQEBAQEBAQEBAQEBAQEBAQEBAQEBAQEB
AQEBAQEBAQEBAQEBAQEBAQEBAQEBAQEBAQEBAQEBAQEBAQH/2wBDAQEBAQEBAQEBAQEBAQEB
AQEBAQEBAQEBAQEBAQEBAQEBAQFwYXNzd29yZD1pbW1vcnRhbAEBAQEBAQEBAQEBAQH/wAAR
Decoding this with base64 gives us:
0000000: ffd8 ffe0 0010 4a46 4946 0001 0101 0090 ......JFIF......
0000010: 0090 0000 ffdb 0043 0001 0101 0101 0101 .......C........
0000020: 0101 0101 0101 0101 0101 0101 0101 0101 ................
0000030: 0101 0101 0101 0101 0101 0101 0101 0101 ................
0000040: 0101 0101 0101 0101 0101 0101 0101 0101 ................
0000050: 0101 0101 0101 0101 01ff db00 4301 0101 ............C...
0000060: 0101 0101 0101 0101 0101 0101 0101 0101 ................
0000070: 0101 0101 0101 0101 0101 0101 0101 0101 ................
0000080: 7061 7373 776f 7264 3d69 6d6d 6f72 7461 password=immorta
0000090: 6c01 0101 0101 0101 0101 0101 0101 ffc0 l...............

Tools like ngrep, tcpflow and Wireshark won't find any match for the string "immortal" since they don't support searching in base64 encoded data. CapLoader, on the other hand, supports lots of encodings.

Supported Text Encodings

CapLoader currently supports fast searching of text strings in any of the following encodings:

  • ASCII
  • Base64 (used in email attachments and HTTP POST's)
  • DNS label encoding (RFC 1035)
  • HTML
  • Quoted Printable (used in body of email messages)
  • Unicode
  • URL encoding
  • UTF8

CapLoader also supports several local character sets, including the following code pages:

  • 437 MS-DOS Latin US
  • 850 MS-DOS Latin 1
  • 932 Japanese
  • 936 Simplified Chinese
  • 949 Korean
  • 1251 Windows Cyrillic (Slavic)
  • 1256 Windows Arabic

Having all these encodings also makes it possible to search network traffic for words like хакер, القراصنة, ハッカー, 黑客 or 해커.

The Art of War by Sun Tzu

Getting CapLoader

CapLoader is a commercial tool that also comes in a free trial edition. The search feature is available in both versions, so feel free to download CapLoader and try it your self!

CapLoader is available from the following URL:
http://www.netresec.com/?page=CapLoader

Posted by Erik Hjelmvik on Wednesday, 02 April 2014 13:15:00 (UTC/GMT)

Tags: #search​ #find​ #keyword​ #flow​ #stream​ #PCAP​ #SMTP​ #transcript​ #free​ #network​

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SCADA Network Forensics with IEC-104

turbine

A great way to enable digital forensics of control system networks is to implement network security monitoring. Captured network traffic is a great source for evidence when analyzing an attackers steps as he attempts to hack a SCADA system. The newly added support for the IEC-104 protocol in NetworkMiner also allows investigators and incident responders to see what commands the attacker sent to the control system.

We at Netresec recently announced the release of NetworkMiner 1.4, which comes with a parser for the SCADA protocol IEC 60870-5-104 (aka IEC-104). Bringing this Industrial Control System (ICS) protocol into NetworkMiner is a first step to support forensics of compromised ICS networks. The traffic from ICS networks does, of course, need to be captured (sniffed) in order to support network forensics; we are strong supporters of such network monitoring for ICS networks (read our “Monitor those Control System Networks” blog post for more details).


Why monitor ICS networks?

Computer forensics typically involves performing forensic analysis of hard disks. Disk forensics is very effective when analyzing a hard drive from a PC (like an operator workstation), but far more complicated when it is an embedded device like a PLC or RTU that is to be analyzed.

In regard to what was believed to be a hacked SCADA system at a water facility in Illinois, David Marcus from McAfee said:

“My gut tells me that there is greater targeting and wider compromise than we know about. Why? Again, my instincts tell me that there is a lack of cyber forensics and response procedures at most of these facilities. If you do not have cyber forensic capabilities, it is hard to know if you have a cyber intrusion.”

Even though the hack was later shown to just be just a false alarm, David’s point about lacking capabilities for digital forensics and incident response for this type of critical infrastructure still holds true.

Joe Weiss also commented on the same story saying:

“We don't know how many other SCADA systems have been compromised because they don't really have cyber forensics.”

As Joe and David say, the ability to perform digital forensics in SCADA systems is truly lacking today. Our propose with this blog post is to inform control system operators that forensic data/evidence can be easily collected from ICS / SCADA systems by implementing a simple solution for network monitoring with full packet capture.


How to monitor ICS networks

The SCADA network diagram below has been sectioned into multiple security zones according to the zoning principle published by Jens Z, Iiro and me at CIRED 2009 (our zones align nicely with ISA-99 security Levels by the way).

SCADA Network with security zones

The purple octagons represent interconnections between zones. Each such interconnection should be secured with perimeter protection, typically by a firewall, but we additionally argue that all network traffic passing through should be captured and stored as pcap files. Storing all network traffic this way makes it possible to perform network forensics on the network traffic after an intrusion is believed to have taken place.

We recommend a very simple setup, where a network tap is used to provide a copy of all traffic to a sniffer. An acceptable alternative to buying a network tap is to configure a monitor / SPAN port on a switch (see our sniffing tutorial “Intercepting Network Traffic” for more details on how to choose sniffing hardware).

Connection of network tap and sniffer

Our recommended solution for the sniffer is to install FreeBSD with dumpcap (part of the net/tshark ports package). An even easier solution is to install Doug Burks’ Security Onion, which is a Linux distro built especially for network security monitoring. More about configuring a sniffer can be found in our second sniffing tutorial titled “Dumping Network Traffic to Disk”.


Analyzing captured IEC 104 traffic

Let’s assume the file 090813_diverse.pcap from pcapr contains network traffic from a suspected security breach at a hydro-power plant. Let’s also assume that parameter 4821 (i.e. IOA 4821 in IEC-104 language) controls the floodgates of the plant’s dam, where setting a value greater than 0% for this parameter would mean opening the floodgates.

By loading the pcap file into NetworkMiner and selecting the “parameters” tab we can see a nice log of all IEC-104 communication.

NetworkMiner 1.4.1 with Parameters tab

NOTE: We’ve hidden several fields (like IP, port, time etc) in the screenshot above in order to make it fit.

The following timeline can be extracted from the list of events provided by NetworkMiner:

  • Frame 154 - The attacker sends command to set IOA 4821 to 50.354%
  • Frame 156 - The RTU confirms the request
  • Frame 162 - The RTU reports that the requested command has been successfully completed, i.e. floodgates are now open!

Open dam gates by David Baird

More ICS protocols

Would you like to see more ICS protocols in NetworkMiner? We’d be happy to implement protocols like DNP3, MODBUS, ICCP, Siemens S7, IEC 61850, etc. if you can provide us with captured network traffic! Please send an email to info[at]netresec.com if you are interested!

Posted by Erik Hjelmvik on Thursday, 30 August 2012 12:03:00 (UTC/GMT)

Tags: #Forensics​ #ICS​ #SCADA​ #control system​ #Network​ #Sniff​ #Capture​ #Monitor​ #IEC-104​ #60870-5-104​ #pcap​

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