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Network Forensics Classes for EU and US

We have now scheduled two new live online classes, one in September and one in October. The September class is adapted to European time and the October one is adapted to American time. The contents are exactly the same in both classes.

PCAP in the mornining

The training is split into four interactive morning sessions (4 hours each), so that you have the afternoon free to either practice what you learned in class or do your “normal” day job. The number of attendees will be limited in order to enable attendees to ask questions or even cover short ad-hoc side tracks. We plan to accept something like 10 to 15 attendees per class. The class registration will be closed once we reach this attendee limit.

  • 🇪🇺 September 20-23, 2021. Live Online Training "PCAP in the Morning EU"
    ⏲️ Time: 8:30 AM to 12:30 PM CET (Central European Time)
    💸 Price: € 820 EUR per student (€ 738 EUR if registering before August 20)
  • 🇺🇸 October 25-28, 2021. Live Online Training "PCAP in the Morning US"
    ⏲️ Time: 9:00 AM to 1:00 PM EDT (US Eastern Daylight Time)
    💸 Price: $1,000 USD per student ($900 USD if registering before September 25)

We will be analyzing a unique 30GB PCAP data set captured during June 2020 on an Internet connected network with multiple clients, an AD server, a web server, an android tablet and some embedded devices. As you’ve probably guessed, the capture files contain traffic from multiple intrusions by various attackers, including APT style attackers and botnet operators. The initial attack vectors are using techniques like exploitation of web vulnerabilities, spear phishing, a supply chain attack and a man-on-the-side attack!

See our training page for more info about the “PCAP in the Morning” classes.

To sign up for a class, simply send an email to sales@netresec.com with the class dates, your name and invoice address. We will then send you a PayPal payment link that you can use to complete your training registration.

Hope to see you there!

Erik H

Cheers,
Erik Hjelmvik
Creator of NetworkMiner and founder of Netresec

Posted by Erik Hjelmvik on Monday, 07 June 2021 09:55:00 (UTC/GMT)

Tags: #Netresec#PCAP#Training#Network Forensics#Class

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Detecting Cobalt Strike and Hancitor traffic in PCAP

This video shows how Cobalt Strike and Hancitor C2 traffic can be detected using CapLoader.

I bet you’re going:

😱 OMG he’s analyzing Windows malware on a Windows PC!!!

Relax, I know what I’m doing. I have also taken the precaution of analyzing the PCAP file in a Windows Sandbox, which just takes a couple of seconds to deploy and run.

The capture file I’m looking at is called “2021-05-13-Hancitor-traffic-with-Ficker-Stealer-and-Cobalt-Strike.pcap” and can be downloaded from here: https://malware-traffic-analysis.net/2021/05/13/index.html

CapLoader’s Services tab shows us that the connections to TCP 80 and 443 on 103.207.42.11 are very periodic, with a detected period of exactly 1 minute. CapLoader successfully identifies the protocols for these two services as Cobalt Strike over HTTP and Cobalt Strike over SSL, respectively. The third service in this list is also very periodic, that’s the Hancitor trojan beaconing to its C2 server every two minutes.

Services tab in CapLoader

CapLoader uses machine learning to identify the application layer protocol based on the behavior of the traffic, not the port number. This means that there can be false positives, i.e. the protocol classification that CapLoader gives a flow or service might be wrong. It is more common, however, for CapLoader to yield false negatives, which means that it can't identify the protocol. The detection of Cobalt Strike inside of HTTP and SSL traffic was recently introduced in the latest 1.9 release of CapLoader. I expected this feature to detect Cobalt Strike traffic in HTTP, but I was delighted to see that CapLoader often detects even TLS encrypted Cobalt Strike beaconing with really good precision!

As shown in the video, the Cobalt Strike beacon config can easily be extracted from the network traffic using NetworkMiner and Didier Stevens’ 1768 K python script.

The output from Didier’s 7868.py tool looks something like this:

0x0001 payload type 0 windows-beacon_http-reverse_http
0x0002 port 80
0x0003 sleeptime 60000
0x0004 maxgetsize 1048576
0x0005 jitter 0
0x0007 publickey 30819f30[...]
0x0008 server,get-uri '103.207.42.11,/ca'
[...]

As you can see, it uses HTTP for transport with a “sleeptime” of 1 minute (60000 ms) and 0% jitter. This means that a new connection will be made to the Cobalt Strike C2 server every minute. The fact that there was no jitter is what gives this service such a high value in CapLoader’s “Periodicity” column.

Network Forensics Training

Are you interested in learning more about how to analyze network traffic from Cobalt Strike and other backdoors, malware and hacker tools? Then take a look at the live online network forensics classes I will be teaching in September and October!

Posted by Erik Hjelmvik on Monday, 31 May 2021 08:30:00 (UTC/GMT)

Tags: #Netresec#Cobalt Strike#CobaltStrike#periodicity#Protocol Identification#PIPI#CapLoader#1768.py#Windows Sandbox#PCAP#NSM#video#videotutorial

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CapLoader 1.9 Released

CapLoader 1.9 Logo

A new version of the PCAP filtering tool CapLoader has been released today. The new CapLoader version 1.9 is now even better at identifying protocols and periodic beacons than before. The user interface has also been improved to make it easier to filter and drill down in network traffic to extract interesting, malicious or unusual traffic.

More Protocols Identified

We’ve added port-independent protocol detection for over 20 new protocols since the last release. The newly added protocols include some that are used by malicious tools and backdoors such as hTran, RevengeRAT, Tofsee and Winsecsrv, as well as legitimate protocols like WireGuard (VPN) and RemoteFX (UDP based remote desktop). We’ve also improved our support for ICS traffic analysis by adding protocol identification of SCADA protocols DNP3 and IEC 60870-5-104.

CapLoader also detects what we call “sub-protocols”, which are communication protocols that use other L7 protocols as transport. We have extended the sub-protocol detection in CapLoader 1.9 to include traffic like Anchor_DNS and dnscat traffic, which both run on top of DNS. We have also added detection of Cobalt Strike beacons over HTTP and HTTPS, even though the latter is quite difficult to detect due to the application data being encrypted.

Improved Usability

CapLoader 1.9 comes with several user interface improvements that help you solve the “needle in the haystack” problem even more efficiently than before.

The context menus in the Flows, Services and Hosts tabs can now be used to select rows based on values in any column, such as “Select all flows where Duration > 10 minutes” (when right-clicking a 10 minute flow).

The “Keyword Filter” is now called “Row Filter” in order to avoid getting it mixed up with the “Find Keyword” feature. The Row Filter has also been enhanced with a new filtering mode, to complement the Contains / All Words / Any Words / RegEx options, which is called “Column Criteria”. The Column Criteria can be used to filter the displayed rows based on the values in a user-specified column. The Column Criteria “Duration > 00:10:00” will, for example, only show flows that are 10 minutes or longer, while “ASN = 3301” shows the flows going to Telia’s AS3301.

CapLoader 1.9 with Column Criteria Row Filter Duration > 00:10:00

Image: CapLoader with Row Filter Column Criteria "Duration > 00:10:00"

We have also extended CapLoader's BPF implementation to support VLAN id’s, so that you can use expressions like “vlan 100” as input filter as well as display filter. The BPF implementation also supports logic operators, so that more advanced filters like “(tcp port 80 or port 443) and not net 149.154.172.0/22” can be used.

CapLoader has a method for detecting periodic connection patterns, which was introduced in CapLoader 1.4. This feature can be used to detect clients that connect to a service at regular intervals, such as a beacon used for command-and-control or email client connecting to a mail server. We have improved the periodicity detection in CapLoader 1.9 so that it now detects periodic services more accurately.

The Initial Round Trip Time (iRRT) in the Flows and Services tabs is now measured in milliseconds instead of seconds in order to avoid “bulky numbers” (h/t Eddi).

There was previously a significant delay when selecting many flows at once (like 100.000). We’ve improved the performance of this feature in CapLoader 1.9, so that you can now select several hundred thousands flows at once without having to wait for an unresponsive GUI to update.

More OSINT Lookup Services

A feature in CapLoader that often comes in handy is the ability to right-click a flow, service or host and open a website with OSINT information about the clicked IP address or domain name. We have now replaced some of the OSINT services with new better ones.

The new services we’ve added to CapLoader 1.9 for performing online OSINT lookups of IP addresses, network services and domain names are:

Bug fixes and Credits

Several bugs have been fixed in this new release of CapLoader, much thanks to feedback we’ve received from our users. We’d like to thank Anders Regert and Mandy van Oosterhout for reporting bugs in CapLoaders “Save As” feature. We’d also like to thank Hyun Dowon for reporting a snap length corruption bug that previously appeared when exporting flows from Pcap-NG files We have also fixed an issue where capture files were previously not always merged in chronological order when being aggregated.

Updating to the Latest Release

Users who have purchased a license for CapLoader can download a free update to version 1.9 from our customer portal. All others can download a free 30 day trial from the CapLoader product page (no registration required).

Posted by Erik Hjelmvik on Tuesday, 25 May 2021 12:20:00 (UTC/GMT)

Tags: #Netresec#CapLoader#PCAP#Pcap-NG#IEC-104#CobaltStrike#BPF#periodicity#OSINT

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Running NetworkMiner in Windows Sandbox

NetworkMiner can be run in a highly efficient Windows Sandbox in order to analyze malicious PCAP files in Windows without accidentally infecting your Windows PC. This blog post shows how to set up a Windows Sandbox that always boots up a fresh install of Windows 10 with the latest version of NetworkMiner installed.

I generally recommend analyzing Windows malware in Linux, or some other non-Windows environment, in order to avoid accidentally infecting yourself (NetworkMiner runs fine in Linux btw). Nevertheless, I still often find myself loading capture files containing malicious network traffic into CapLoader and NetworkMiner under Windows. I have previously demonstrated that this can be a quick and crude way to perform an anti virus scan of files contained in a pcap file.

Windows Sandbox

If you want to analyze malicious traffic in Windows with minimal risk of infecting yourself then you should definitely check out Microsoft’s Windows Sandbox (available in Windows 10 Pro and Enterprise editions). The Windows Sandbox is using Windows containers, so it’s very efficient compared to spinning up a full Windows VM. It also provides features like kernel isolation, so that the sandbox container doesn’t use the same kernel as the host, and ensures that a new Windows environment is created every time the sandbox is run. Windows Sandbox also doesn't run any anti-virus, so it won't interfere with the extraction of malicious contents from within the analyzed capture files.

Follow these steps to install Windows Sandbox:

  1. Run OptionalFeatures.exe (the “Turn Windows features on or off” window)
  2. Enable the “Windows Sandbox” feature (check the box)
  3. Reboot

Then create a sandbox config, which downloads and installs the latest version of NetworkMiner every time the sandbox is started, by creating a file called “NetworkMinerSandbox.wsb” with the following contents:

<Configuration>
  <MappedFolders>
    <MappedFolder>
      <!-- Replace path below with your PCAP dir -->
      <HostFolder>C:\Users\Erik\pcap</HostFolder>
      <ReadOnly>true</ReadOnly>
    </MappedFolder>
  </MappedFolders>
  <LogonCommand>
    <Command>cmd.exe /C "curl -L https://www.netresec.com/?download=NetworkMiner | tar -C C:\Users\WDAGUtilityAccount\Desktop\ -xf -"</Command>
  </LogonCommand>
</Configuration>

Note: Replace “C:\Users\Erik\pcap” with whatever location your capture files are at

After starting NetworkMinerSandbox.wsb you’ll have a fresh Windows machine up and running within a couple of seconds. The latest version of NetworkMiner and your PCAP dir are both accessible from the sandbox’s desktop.

Windows Sandbox

Image: NetworkMiner 2.6 installed in a clean Windows Sandbox environment

Moving files in or out of the sandbox is just a matter of copy and paste (Ctrl+C / Ctrl+V).

VirtualBox and Windows Sandbox

VirtualBox error message Cannot enable nested VT-x/AMD-V without nested-paging and unrestricted guest execution

Are you using VirtualBox to run virtual machines on your Windows host and getting an error message saying “Cannot enable nested VT-x/AMD-V without nested-paging and unrestricted guest execution” after enabling Windows Sandbox?

Even though Windows Sandbox doesn’t need Hyper-V it still requires a hypervisor, which unfortunately conflicts with VirtualBox. You can disable the hypervisor by running the following command as administrator:

bcdedit.exe /set hypervisorlaunchtype off

...and then rebooting the computer before starting a VirtualBox VM with “nested VT-x” enabled. Turning off the hypervisor will unfortunately prevent Windows Sandbox from running, giving an error message saying “No hypervisor was found. Please enable hypervisor support.”

Windows Sandbox error message No hypervisor was found. Please enable hypervisor support.

To re-enable the hypervisor, in order to run Windows Sandbox again, you’ll need to run

bcdedit.exe /set hypervisorlaunchtype auto

and reboot the host.

Update May 26, 2021

We have now uploaded a simple Windows Sandbox config to our website here:

https://www.netresec.com/?download=NetworkMinerSandbox

This script runs on any Windows Pro machine that has the Sandbox feature active.

Posted by Erik Hjelmvik on Tuesday, 11 May 2021 13:39:00 (UTC/GMT)

Tags: #Netresec#NetworkMiner#PCAP#Windows#Sandbox#Windows Sandbox#Malware

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Live Online Training - PCAP in the Morning

Would you like to spend four mornings in May analyzing capture files together with me?

I love the smell of PCAP in the Morning

I have now scheduled a live online network forensics training called “PCAP in the Morning” that will run on May 3-6 (Monday to Thursday) between 8:30 AM and 12:30 PM EDT (US Eastern Daylight Time). We will be analyzing a unique 30GB PCAP data set captured during June 2020 on an Internet connected network with multiple clients, an AD server, a web server, an android tablet and some embedded devices. As you’ve probably guessed, the capture files contain traffic from multiple intrusions by various attackers, including APT style attackers and botnet operators. The initial attack vectors are using techniques like exploitation of web vulnerabilities, spear phishing, a supply chain attack and a man-on-the-side attack!

See our training page for more info about the “PCAP in the Morning” training.

To sign up for my “PCAP in the Morning” class, simply send an email to sales@netresec.com with your name and invoice address. We will then send you a PayPal payment link that you can use to complete your training registration. The training costs $950 USD per participant, for which you will also get a six month single user license for NetworkMiner Professional and CapLoader.

Hope to see you there!

Erik H

Cheers,
Erik Hjelmvik
Creator of NetworkMiner and founder of Netresec

Update June 7, 2021

We have now scheduled two new training events adapted for students in different time zones.

  • September 20-23, 2021. Live Online Training "PCAP in the Morning EU" (🇪🇺)
  • October 25-28, 2021. Live Online Training "PCAP in the Morning US" (🇺🇸)

More information about the network forensics classes can be found on our training page.

Posted by Erik Hjelmvik on Friday, 19 March 2021 14:03:00 (UTC/GMT)

Tags: #Netresec#PCAP#Training#Network Forensics

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Finding Targeted SUNBURST Victims with pDNS

Our SunburstDomainDecoder tool can now be used to identify SUNBURST victims that have been explicitly targeted by the attackers. The only input needed is passive DNS (pDNS) data for avsvmcloud.com subdomains.

Companies and organizations that have installed trojanized a SolarWinds Orion update containing the SUBURST backdoor will send DNS queries for seemingly random subdomains of avsvmcloud.com. Some of these DNS queries actually contain the victim's internal AD domain encoded into the subdomain, as explained in our blog post Reassembling Victim Domain Fragments from SUNBURST DNS.

Three Stages of SUNBURST Backdoor Operation

Most SUNBURST victims were luckily not targeted by the attackers. This means that the backdoor never made it past "STAGE1" of the infection process. Nevertheless, the attackers did choose to proceed to "STAGE2" with some victims. As explained in FireEye's blog post SUNBURST Additional Technical Details, the "C2 coordinator" can proceed to the next stage by responding with a DNS A record pointing to an IP address within any of these three ranges:

  • 18.130.0.0/16
  • 99.79.0.0/16
  • 184.72.0.0/15

According to FireEye's "Diagram of actor operations and usage of SUNBURST", the decision to proceed to the next stage is based upon whether or not the victim's internal AD domain is "interesting to attack".

Note: "STAGE2" is referred to as "associated mode" in FireEye's blog post.

SUNBURST backdoors that have entered STAGE2 will allow CNAME records in DNS responses to be used as new C2 domains.

Sunburst stages 1 to 3 (passive, associated and active)

We have discovered that the SUNBURST backdoor actually uses a single bit in the queried avsvmcloud.com subdomain in order to flag that it has entered STAGE2 and is accepting new C2 domains in CNAME records. This bit is called flag, ext or dnssec in the malicious SUNBURST implant and can be extracted from DNS queries that have an encoded timestamp, such as those indicating which security products that are installed.

Detecting STAGE2 DNS Requests

Our SunburstDomainDecoder tool has now been updated to include a "STAGE2" tag in the output for DNS queries containing this stage 2 flag. This means that organizations like national CERTs, who perform incident response coordination and victim notification, can now use SunburstDomainDecoder in order to identify and notify targeted SUNBURST victims that have entered STAGE2.

Here's the output we get when feeding SunburstDomainDecoder with Bambenek's uniq-hostnames.txt passive DNS data and only displaying lines containing "STAGE2":

SunburstDomainDecoder.exe < uniq-hostnames.txt | findstr STAGE2
22334A7227544B1E 2020-09-29T04:00:00.0000000Z,STAGE2 5qbtj04rcbp3tiq8bo6t
FC07EB59E028D3EE 2020-06-13T09:00:00.0000000Z,STAGE2 6a57jk2ba1d9keg15cbg
1D71011E992C3D68 2020-06-11T22:30:00.0000000Z,STAGE2 7sbvaemscs0mc925tb99
F90BDDB47E495629 2020-06-13T08:30:00.0000000Z,STAGE2 gq1h856599gqh538acqn
DB7DE5B93573A3F7 2020-06-20T02:30:00.0000000Z,STAGE2 ihvpgv9psvq02ffo77et
3C327147876E6EA4 2020-07-22T17:00:00.0000000Z,STAGE2 k5kcubuassl3alrf7gm3
3C327147876E6EA4 2020-07-23T18:30:00.0000000Z,STAGE2 mhdosoksaccf9sni9icp
1D71011E992C3D68 central.pima.gov,STAGE2
DB7DE5B93573A3F7 coxnet.cox.com,STAGE2,WindowsDefender
F90BDDB47E495629 central.pima.gov,STAGE2

Most of these subdomains are listed in FireEye's Indicator_Release_NBIs.csv file as having CNAME pointers to other SUNBURST C2 domains like: freescanonline[.]com, deftsecurity[.]com and thedoccloud[.]com. But the first domain, with GUID 22334A7227544B1E, was actually not part of FireEye's IOC data.

Even more STAGE2 domains and GUID values can be found by analyzing other passive DNS resources, such as this passive DNS dump on pastebin by Rohit Bansal.

curl -s https://pastebin.com/raw/6EDgCKxd | SunburstDomainDecoder.exe | findstr STAGE2
E258332529826721 2020-07-18T05:00:00.0000000Z,STAGE2 1dbecfd99ku6fi2e5fjb
2039AFE13E5307A1 2020-05-30T14:30:00.0000000Z,STAGE2 4n4vte5gmor7j9lpegsf
22334A7227544B1E 2020-09-29T04:00:00.0000000Z,STAGE2 5qbtj04rcbp3tiq8bo6t
FC07EB59E028D3EE 2020-06-13T09:00:00.0000000Z,STAGE2 6a57jk2ba1d9keg15cbg
1D71011E992C3D68 2020-06-11T22:30:00.0000000Z,STAGE2 7sbvaemscs0mc925tb99
1D71011E992C3D68 2020-06-11T22:30:00.0000000Z,STAGE2 7sbvaemscs0mc925tb99
F90BDDB47E495629 2020-06-13T08:30:00.0000000Z,STAGE2 gq1h856599gqh538acqn
F90BDDB47E495629 2020-06-13T08:30:00.0000000Z,STAGE2 gq1h856599gqh538acqn
DB7DE5B93573A3F7 2020-06-20T02:30:00.0000000Z,STAGE2 ihvpgv9psvq02ffo77et
DB7DE5B93573A3F7 2020-06-20T02:30:00.0000000Z,STAGE2 ihvpgv9psvq02ffo77et
3C327147876E6EA4 2020-07-23T18:30:00.0000000Z,STAGE2 mhdosoksaccf9sni9icp

After removing the domains already present in FireEye's IOC we're left with the following FQDN's that have been requested by SUNBURST backdoors in STAGE2:

  • 1dbecfd99ku6fi2e5fjb.appsync-api.us-east-1.avsvmcloud.com
  • 4n4vte5gmor7j9lpegsf.appsync-api.eu-west-1.avsvmcloud.com
  • 5qbtj04rcbp3tiq8bo6t.appsync-api.us-east-1.avsvmcloud.com

Update January 7, 2021

Paul Vixie kindly shared his SunburstDomainDecoder output on Twitter yesterday. Paul's results show that the victim with GUID FC07EB59E028D3EE, which corresponds to the "6a57jk2ba1d9keg15cbg.appsync-api.eu-west-1.avsvmcloud[.]com" CNAME entry in FireEye's IOC, was Pima County. This means that 3C327147876E6EA4 is the only GUID among the CNAME records published by FireEye that cannot yet be tied to a victim organization. Paul's data also reveals two new STAGE2 victim GUIDs (65A28A36F24D379D and 8D2267C5A00796DA).

Update January 12, 2021

With help of SunburstDomainDecoder 1.9 and passive DNS data from Dancho Danchev we've been able to verify that Palo Alto have installed the maliocous SUNBURST backdoor and that it entered into STAGE2 opreration on September 29, 2020. Palo Alto's CEO Nikesh Arora has confirmed that they were hit by SUNBURST (or "SolarStorm" as they call it).

Update January 25, 2021

On December 17 VriesHd tweeted a link to a Google Docs spreatsheet containing aggregated SUNBURST DNS request data.

Might be helpfull with the SolarWinds/SUNBURST data to combine one another, so here's all the data (subdomain, region, first seen date, decrypted DGA) that I'm personally aware of in a Google sheet atm. Feel free to comment with new or updated information

One month later VriesHd made some substatial additions to the "SB2" spreadsheet, which by then contained several new STAGE2 victims. We have since then actively been trying to reach out to the targeted organizations, either directly or through CERT organizations, who perform incident response coordination and help with the victim notification process. VriesHd's passive DNS collection has now been incorporated into the SUNBURST STAGE2 Victim Table below.

Targeted SUNBURST Victims

Here's a summary of the STAGE2 beacons from SUNBURST victims that can be extracted from publicly available data:

GUID avsvmcloud.com Subdomain Timestamp (UTC) AD Domain
FF1E34A864BCE106 dh1usc8287hr46bia74a 2020-05-14 14:30 nsanet.local
E5E2AD2B6DE697D6 70fov85qclvubqhf9vlh 2020-05-16 19:30 cisco.com
FF1E34A864BCE106 2die0g7i5kgkki628gaj 2020-05-18 11:30 nsanet.local
3E8DF7FF13FC8D38 7hpaqi751fqoei2fdv8m 2020-05-18 16:30 HQ.FIDELIS
FF1E34A864BCE106 tsem12v1rn620hatfol2 2020-05-20 14:30 nsanet.local
FF1E34A864BCE106 a0hmuoveln2400sfvf6n 2020-05-20 16:30 nsanet.local
0C1A5A27B297FE46 k0biaol9fc84ummfn7vi 2020-05-26 11:30 vgn.viasatgsd.com
A887B592B7E5B550 m4apr0vu9qnomtun3b9t 2020-05-26 20:00 WincoreWindows.local
2039AFE13E5307A1 4n4vte5gmor7j9lpegsf 2020-05-30 14:30 suk.sas.com
06A4EA63C80EE24A 9q5jifedn8aflr4ge3nu 2020-05-31 12:00 scc.state.va.us
9850F550BD1010F2 gth7uravpvaapoi86834 2020-05-31 20:00 lagnr.chevrontexaco.net
E5E2AD2B6DE697D6 8k56mm0b876uvf5e7rd3 2020-06-01 19:00 cisco.com
2039AFE13E5307A1 laog1ushfp80e3f18cjg 2020-06-03 01:30 suk.sas.com
06A4EA63C80EE24A ntlcvjpqc57t9kb8ac75 2020-06-03 23:30 scc.state.va.us
1D71011E992C3D68 7sbvaemscs0mc925tb99 2020-06-11 22:30 central.pima.gov
F90BDDB47E495629 gq1h856599gqh538acqn 2020-06-13 08:30 central.pima.gov
FC07EB59E028D3EE 6a57jk2ba1d9keg15cbg 2020-06-13 09:00 central.pima.gov
583141933D242B0D f25k66k5hu68fneu7ocd 2020-06-16 06:00 logitech.local
52CE2BAFD69B2D0E f2co92njkm9od5eu7btg 2020-06-16 18:30 fc.gov
FACC72E2207CD69F rkspr9a19fl8r5ipggi1 2020-06-17 01:00 fox.local
3256C1BCAF74B5FC p0a7jjdp4eq9o2vok1mt 2020-06-18 07:00 ng.ds.army.mil
92DC5436D54898CD lusq9mg6j1e3jii5f66o 2020-06-18 17:30 ddsn.gov
DB7DE5B93573A3F7 ihvpgv9psvq02ffo77et 2020-06-20 02:30 coxnet.cox.com
59956D687A42F160 o49qi0qbfm37o6jul639 2020-06-23 06:00 wctc.msft
123EDA14721C3602 p5iokg3v9tntqcbo77p2 2020-06-29 08:30 scc.state.va.us
123EDA14721C3602 84v0j8kkbvqf8ntt4o9f 2020-06-30 10:30 scc.state.va.us
2F52CFFCD8993B63 0tvuasje2vc2i2413m6i 2020-07-01 16:30 mgt.srb.europa*
65A28A36F24D379D 7u32o0m6ureci8h5eo6k 2020-07-02 01:00
2F52CFFCD8993B63 en1clufg22h2uca27ro3 2020-07-03 06:00 mgt.srb.europa*
2F52CFFCD8993B63 s2r15kp335mnlq65i6ce 2020-07-03 09:00 mgt.srb.europa*
DB4013DDA16F6A40 up1vj67jjj9tpvceu7ak 2020-07-08 01:00 los.local
123EDA14721C3602 l0vos8o9m5p3m8of7g96 2020-07-10 22:00 scc.state.va.us
E5E2AD2B6DE697D6 8kr7r16da442u75egv1s 2020-07-15 14:00 cisco.com
A13731B17632C726 ttj6cro8jm6cfma8noo7 2020-07-17 12:30 phpds.org
E5E2AD2B6DE697D6 gh1so69rl1sgrgf38gr5 2020-07-17 15:00 cisco.com
E258332529826721 1dbecfd99ku6fi2e5fjb 2020-07-18 05:00
123EDA14721C3602 epm95unblvj984s2ovqh 2020-07-22 11:00 scc.state.va.us
3C327147876E6EA4 k5kcubuassl3alrf7gm3 2020-07-22 17:00 corp.qualys.com
3C327147876E6EA4 mhdosoksaccf9sni9icp 2020-07-23 18:30 corp.qualys.com
F2C9AC93206ABF47 onpqb88oq440lq82p7lb 2020-07-24 05:00 jpso.gov
123EDA14721C3602 0qthjq50jbdvnjq16o8f 2020-07-27 17:00 scc.state.va.us
123EDA14721C3602 gu6r7k260p6afq3ticso 2020-07-28 17:30 scc.state.va.us
936F78AB73AA3022 i4d2krbn2f92jo3uj8r9 2020-08-04 05:00 ggsg-us.cisco.com
936F78AB73AA3022 et2gu9tg5ckrsvaj5bom 2020-08-05 06:00 ggsg-us.cisco.com
22334A7227544B1E 5qbtj04rcbp3tiq8bo6t 2020-09-29 04:00 paloaltonetworks*

SUNBURST STAGE2 Victim Table
Sources: John Bambenek, Joe Słowik, Rohit Bansal, Dancho Danchev , Paul Vixie, FireEye and VriesHd.

Identifying More SUNBURST STAGE2 Victims

Companies and organizations with access to more passive DNS resources will hopefully be able to use SunburstDomainDecoder to identify additional targeted SUNBURST victims that have progressed to STAGE2.

Download SunburstDomainDecoder

Our tool SunburstDomainDecoder is released under a Creative Commons CC-BY license, and can be downloaded here:

https://www.netresec.com/files/SunburstDomainDecoder.zip

You can also read more about SunburstDomainDecoder in our blog post Reassembling Victim Domain Fragments from SUNBURST DNS.

Posted by Erik Hjelmvik on Monday, 04 January 2021 21:11:00 (UTC/GMT)

Tags: #Netresec#pDNS#SUNBURST#SolarWinds#Solorigate#SunburstDomainDecoder#SolarStorm#STAGE2#avsvmcloud#C2

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PolarProxy 0.8.16 Released

PolarProxy 0.8.16 We are happy to announce a new release of the TLS decryption tool PolarProxy. The new version has been updated to support features like client certificates and a PCAP-over-IP connector.

Client Certificates

PolarProxy now supports client-authenticated TLS handshakes for outgoing connections to support sites that require mutual TLS (mTLS) authentication. The following example uses the PKCS#12 client certificate "client.p12" with password "pwd" to authenticate PolarProxy when connecting to "https://api.example.com":

./PolarProxy -p 10443,80,443 --clientcert api.example.com:client.p12:pwd

Thanks to Peter Lambrechtsen for the idea!

Bypassing Decryption for Specific Domains

There are situations when it isn't appropriate to decrypt the traffic passing through PolarProxy. The traffic might, for example, contain personal or confidential information. It might also not be possible to decrypt the traffic for technical reasons, such as when clients use certificate pinning or certificate transparency to validate the server certificate. We therefore recommend that such sites are put on a "bypass" list, i.e. a list of domains for which PolarProxy should let the encrypted traffic pass untouched to preserve the end-to-end encryption between the client and server.

PolarProxy's "--bypass <file>" option, which can be used to provide a regular expression list of domains not to decrypt, has now been acompanied by "--bypassexact <file>". The new --bypassexact option simply matches domains against the lines in <file> using string matching of the full domain name, no fancy-pants regex involved.

PCAP-over-IP Client

The new "--pcapoveripconnect" option can be used to let PolarProxy connect to a PCAP-over-IP listener and send it a live PCAP stream of decrypted traffic over TCP. This option complements PolarProxy's "--pcapoverip" option, which sets up a PCAP-over-IP listener that serves clients with the same PCAP stream. Thanks to Andy Wick for suggesting adding a PCAP-over-IP connector to PolarProxy!

The following command instructs PolarProxy to send a live PCAP stream with decrypted traffic to a local PCAP-over-IP listener:

./PolarProxy -p 10443,80,443 --pcapoveripconnect 127.0.0.1:57012

PolarProxy will automatically attempt to re-establish the PCAP-over-IP connection every 10 seconds if it goes down or cannot be established for some reason.

Only Store Packets When Instructed

PolarProxy no longer writes hourly rotated pcap files with decrypted packets to disk unless explicitly instructed to do so with "-o <directory>" or "-w <file>".

Flushing Buffered Packets to Disk

PolarProxy now periodically flushes buffered packets to disk every 60 seconds. The flush interval can be controlled with the "--autoflush <seconds>" option. The auto flush can also be disabled with "--autoflush 0".

No More Out-of-Quota Issues

We have also improved the quota handling for our privileged users, who have a license key that allows them to decrypt more than 10 GB or 10 000 TLS sessions per day. You should now be able to use your full daily quota without issues!

Posted by Erik Hjelmvik on Monday, 30 November 2020 07:45:00 (UTC/GMT)

Tags: #Netresec#PolarProxy#PCAP#TLS#PCAP-over-IP#pcapoverip#certificate

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RawCap Redux

RawCap A new version of RawCap has been released today. This portable little sniffer now supports writing PCAP data to stdout and named pipes as an alternative to saving the captured packets to disk. We have also changed the target .NET Framework version from 2.0 to 4.7.2, so that you can run RawCap on a modern Windows OS without having to install a legacy .NET Framework.

Here’s a summary of the improvements in the new RawCap version (0.2.0.0) compared to the old version (0.1.5.0):

  • Uses .NET 4.7.2 instead of 2.0
  • Support for writing to stdout
  • Support for writing to named pipes
  • Large (64 MB) ring buffer to prevent packet drops
  • Automatic firewall configuration

Out of the software we develop and maintain here at Netresec, NetworkMiner is the most popular one. But you’re probably not aware that RawCap is our second most popular tool in terms of downloads, with around 100 unique downloads every day. RawCap started out as just being a quick hack that we released for free to the community in 2011 without expecting it to gain much attention. However, it quickly gained popularity, maybe due to the fact that it’s just a tiny .exe file and that it doesn’t require any external libraries or DLL’s to sniff network traffic (other than the .NET Framework).

RawCap embraces the Unix philosophy to do only one thing, and do it well. Thanks to RawCap’s simplicity we have only needed to make a few minor updates of the tool since its first release 9 years ago. However, today we’re finally adding some new features that have been requested by users over the years. One such feature is that RawCap now automatically creates a Windows firewall rule when the tool is started. Before this feature was introduced users would have to run wf.msc (i.e. the "Windows Defender Firewall with Advanced Security") and manually create an inbound rule to allow RawCap.exe to receive incoming traffic. Without such a firewall rule RawCap would only be able to capture outgoing traffic.

RawCap can be started in two different modes. Either as an interactive console application, or as a “normal” command line utility. Run RawCap.exe without any arguments, or simply double click the RawCap.exe icon to use the interactive mode. You will then be asked which interface to capture packets from and what filename you’d like to save them to.

F:\Tools>RawCap.exe
Network interfaces:
0.     192.168.0.17    Local Area Connection
1.     192.168.0.47    Wireless Network Connection
2.     90.130.211.54   3G UMTS Internet
3.     192.168.111.1   VMware Network Adapter VMnet1
4.     192.168.222.1   VMware Network Adapter VMnet2
5.     127.0.0.1       Loopback Pseudo-Interface
Select network interface to sniff [default '0']: 1
Output path or filename [default 'dumpfile.pcap']:
Sniffing IP : 192.168.0.47
Output File : dumpfile.pcap
 --- Press [Ctrl]+C to stop ---
Packets     : 1337

The other alternative is to supply all the arguments to RawCap when it is started. Use “RawCap --help” to show which arguments you can use. You’ll need to use this mode if you want to write the captured traffic to standard output (stdout) or a named pipe, or if you want RawCap to automatically stop capturing after a certain time or packet count.

F:\Tools>RawCap.exe --help
NETRESEC RawCap version 0.2.0.0

Usage: RawCap.exe [OPTIONS] <interface> <pcap_target>
 <interface> can be an interface number or IP address
 <pcap_target> can be filename, stdout (-) or named pipe (starting with \\.\pipe\)

OPTIONS:
 -f          Flush data to file after each packet (no buffer)
 -c <count>  Stop sniffing after receiving <count> packets
 -s <sec>    Stop sniffing after <sec> seconds
 -m          Disable automatic creation of RawCap firewall entry
 -q          Quiet, don't print packet count to standard out

INTERFACES:
 0.     IP        : 169.254.63.243
        NIC Name  : Local Area Connection
        NIC Type  : Ethernet

 1.     IP        : 192.168.1.129
        NIC Name  : WiFi
        NIC Type  : Wireless80211

 2.     IP        : 127.0.0.1
        NIC Name  : Loopback Pseudo-Interface 1
        NIC Type  : Loopback

 3.     IP        : 10.165.240.132
        NIC Name  : Mobile 12
        NIC Type  : Wwanpp

Example 1: RawCap.exe 0 dumpfile.pcap
Example 2: RawCap.exe -s 60 127.0.0.1 localhost.pcap
Example 3: RawCap.exe 127.0.0.1 \\.\pipe\RawCap
Example 4: RawCap.exe -q 127.0.0.1 - | Wireshark.exe -i - -k

As you can see, running “RawCap.exe -s 60 127.0.0.1 localhost.pcap” will capture packets from localhost to a file called “localhost.pcap” for 60 seconds and then exit.

There are a couple of drawbacks with the new RawCap version though, it is a larger binary (48kB instead of 23kB) and it uses more CPU and RAM compared to the old version. We will therefore continue making the old RawCap version available to anyone who might need it.

Visit the RawCap product page to download this tool and learn more.

Posted by Erik Hjelmvik on Thursday, 30 January 2020 14:32:00 (UTC/GMT)

Tags: #Netresec#RawCap#sniffer#PCAP#named pipe#Wireshark#WiFi#loopback#127.0.0.1

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2018 November

Remote Packet Dumps from PacketCache

2018 August

NetworkMiner 2.3.2 Released!

2018 April

NetworkMiner 2.3 Released!

2018 February

Examining Malware Redirects with NetworkMiner Professional

Analyzing Kelihos SPAM in CapLoader and NetworkMiner

Antivirus Scanning of a PCAP File

Zyklon Malware Network Forensics Video Tutorial

2017 April

Network Forensics Training in London

2017 February

10 Years of NetworkMiner

2017 January

Network Forensics Training at TROOPERS 2017

2016 October

Reading cached packets with Wireshark

Detect TCP content injection attacks with findject

2016 September

Bug Bounty PCAP T-shirts

2015 December

Network Forensics Training at TROOPERS

2015 June

Two-day Network Forensics Class in Stockholm

2015 March

China's Man-on-the-Side Attack on GitHub

2015 January

Chinese MITM attack on outlook.com

2014 October

Chinese MITM Attack on iCloud

2014 June

NetworkMiner 1.6 Released

2014 March

Carving Network Packets from Memory Dump Files

2013 October

Command-line Forensics of hacked PHP.net

DNS whitelisting in NetworkMiner

2013 September

New features in NetworkMiner 1.5

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