NETRESEC Network Security Blog

Wednesday, 12 November 2014 21:09:00 (UTC/GMT)

Observing the Havex RAT

Havex RAT, original 'Street-rat' by Edal Anton Lefterov. Licensed under Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0

It has, so far, been publicly reported that three ICS vendors have spread the Havex Remote-Access-Tool (RAT) as part of their official downloads. We've covered the six pieces of software from these three vendors in our blog post ”Full Disclosure of Havex Trojans”. In this blog post we proceed by analyzing network traffic generated by Havex.


Indicators of Compromise

Before going into details of our analysis we'd like to recommend a few other resources that can be used to detect the Havex RAT. There are three Havex IDS signatures available via Emerging Threats. There are also Yara rules and OpenIOC signatures available for Havex. Additionally, the following domains are known to be used in the later versions (043 and 044) of Havex according to Kaspersky:

  • disney.freesexycomics.com
  • electroconf.xe0.ru
  • rapidecharge.gigfa.com
  • sinfulcelebs.freesexycomics.com
  • www.iamnumber.com


HTTP Command-and-Control

The Havex RAT Command-and-Control (C2) protocol is based on HTTP POST requests, which typically look something like this:

POST /blogs/wp-content/plugins/buddypress/bp-settings/bpsettings-src.php?id=84651193834787196090098FD80-c8a7af419640516616c342b13efab&​v1=043&​v2=170393861&​q=45474bca5c3a10c8e94e56543c2bd

As you can see, four variables are sent in the QueryString of this HTTP POST request; namely id, v1, v2 and q. Let's take a closer look to see what data is actually sent to the C2 server in the QueryString.

ParamDescriptionCommon Values
id host identifier id=[random number][random hex]-c8a7af419640516616c342b13efab
id=[random number][random-hex]-003f6dd097e6f392bd1928066eaa3
v1Havex version 043
044
v2Windows version 170393861 (Windows XP)
498073862 (Windows 7)
498139398 (Windows 7, SP1)
q Unknown q=45474bca5c3a10c8e94e56543c2bd (Havex 043)
q=0c6256822b15510ebae07104f3152 (Havex 043)
q=214fd4a8895e07611ab2dac9fae46 (Havex 044)
q=35a37eab60b51a9ce61411a760075 (Havex 044)

Analyzing a Havex PCAP

I had the pleasure to discuss the Havex Malware with Joel Langill, when we met at the 4SICS conference in Stockholm last month. Joel was nice enough to provide me with a 800 MB PCAP file from when he executed the Havex malware in an Internet connected lab environment.

CapLoader Transcript of Havex C2 traffic
Image: CapLoader transcript of Havex C2 traffic

I used the command line tool NetworkMinerCLI (in Linux) to automatically extract all HTTP downloads from Joel's PCAP file to disk. This way I also got a CSV log file with some useful metadata about the extracted files. Let's have a closer look at what was extracted:

$ mono NetworkMinerCLI.exe -r new-round-09-setup.pcap
Closing file handles...
970167 frames parsed in 1337.807 seconds.

$ cut -d, -f 1,2,3,4,7,12 new-round-09-setup.pcap.FileInfos.csv | head

SourceIP   SourcePort  DestinationIP  DestinationPort FileSize   Frame
185.27.134.100   TCP 80   192.168.1.121   TCP 1238   244 676 B       14
198.63.208.206   TCP 80   192.168.1.121   TCP 1261       150 B     1640
185.27.134.100   TCP 80   192.168.1.121   TCP 1286   359 508 B     3079
185.27.134.100   TCP 80   192.168.1.121   TCP 1311   236 648 B     4855
185.27.134.100   TCP 80   192.168.1.121   TCP 1329       150 B    22953
185.27.134.100   TCP 80   192.168.1.121   TCP 1338       150 B    94678
185.27.134.100   TCP 80   192.168.1.121   TCP 1346       150 B   112417
198.63.208.206   TCP 80   192.168.1.121   TCP 1353       150 B   130108
198.63.208.206   TCP 80   192.168.1.121   TCP 1365       150 B   147902

Files downloaded through Havex C2 communication are typically modules to be executed. However, these modules are downloaded in a somewhat obfuscated format; in order to extract them one need to do the following:

  • Base64 decode
  • Decompress (bzip2)
  • XOR with ”1312312”

To be more specific, here's a crude one-liner that I used to calculate MD5 hashes of the downloaded modules:

$ tail -c +95 C2_download.html | base64 -d | bzcat -d | xortool-xor -s "1312312" -f - -n | tail -c +330 | md5sum

To summarize the output from this one-liner, here's a list of the downloaded modules in Joel's PCAP file:

First
frame
Last
frame
Downloaded HTML MD5 Extracted module MD5
142937818cb3853eea675414480892ddfe6687cff1403546eba915f1d7c023f12a0df
307916429b20948513a1a4ea77dc3fc808a5ebb9840417d79736471c2f331550be993d79
48555117fb46a96fdd53de1b8c5e9826d85d42d6ba8da708b8784afd36c44bb5f1f436bc

All three extracted modules are known binaries associated with Havex. The third module is one of the Havex OPC scanner modules, let's have a look at what happens on the network after this module has been downloaded!


Analyzing Havex OPC Traffic

In Joel's PCAP file, the OPC module download finished at frame 5117. Less then a second later we see DCOM/MS RPC traffic. To understand this traffic we need to know how to interpret the UUID's used by MS RPC.

Marion Marschalek has listed 10 UUID's used by the Havex OPC module in order to enumerate OPC components. However, we've only observed four of these commands actually being used by the Havex OPC scanner module. These commands are:

MS RPC UUIDOPC-DA Command
9dd0b56c-ad9e-43ee-8305-487f3188bf7aIOPCServerList2
55c382c8-21c7-4e88-96c1-becfb1e3f483IOPCEnumGUID
39c13a4d-011e-11d0-9675-0020afd8adb3IOPCServer
39227004-a18f-4b57-8b0a-5235670f4468IOPCBrowse

Of these commands the ”IOPC Browse” is the ultimate goal for the Havex OPC scanner, since that's the command used to enumerate all OPC tags on an OPC server. Now, let's have a look at the PCAP file to see what OPC commands (i.e. UUID's) that have been issued.

$ tshark -r new-round-09-setup.first6000.pcap -n -Y 'dcerpc.cn_bind_to_uuid != 99fcfec4-5260-101b-bbcb-00aa0021347a' -T fields -e frame.number -e ip.dst -e dcerpc.cn_bind_to_uuid -Eoccurrence=f -Eheader=y

frame.nr  ip.dst      dcerpc.cn_bind_to_uuid
5140    192.168.1.97  000001a0-0000-0000-c000-000000000046
5145    192.168.1.11  000001a0-0000-0000-c000-000000000046
5172    192.168.1.97  000001a0-0000-0000-c000-000000000046
5185    192.168.1.11  9dd0b56c-ad9e-43ee-8305-487f3188bf7a
5193    192.168.1.97  000001a0-0000-0000-c000-000000000046
5198    192.168.1.11  55c382c8-21c7-4e88-96c1-becfb1e3f483
5212    192.168.1.11  00000143-0000-0000-c000-000000000046
5247    192.168.1.11  000001a0-0000-0000-c000-000000000046
5257    192.168.1.11  00000143-0000-0000-c000-000000000046
5269    192.168.1.11  00000143-0000-0000-c000-000000000046
5274    192.168.1.11  39c13a4d-011e-11d0-9675-0020afd8adb3
5280    192.168.1.11  39c13a4d-011e-11d0-9675-0020afd8adb3
5285    192.168.1.11  39227004-a18f-4b57-8b0a-5235670f4468
5286    192.168.1.11  39227004-a18f-4b57-8b0a-5235670f4468
[...]

We can thereby verify that the IOPCBrowse command was sent to one of Joel's OPC servers in frame 5285 and 5286. However, tshark/Wireshark is not able to parse the list of OPC items (tags) that are returned from this function call. Also, in order to find all IOPCBrowse commands in a more effective way we'd like to search for the binary representation of this command with tools like ngrep or CapLoader. It would even be possible to generate an IDS signature for IOPCBrowse if we'd know what to look for.

The first part of an MSRPC UUID is typically sent in little endian, which means that the IOPCBrowse command is actually sent over the wire as:

04 70 22 39 8f a1 57 4b 8b 0a 52 35 67 0f 44 68

Let's search for that value in Joel's PCAP file:

CapLoader 1.2 Find Keyword Window
Image: Searching for IOPCBrowse byte sequence with CapLoader

CapLoader 1.2 flow view
Image: CapLoader with 169 extracted flows matching IOPCBrowse UUID

Apparently 169 flows contain one or several packets that match the IOPCBrowse UUID. Let's do a “Flow Transcript” and see if any OPC tags have been sent back to the Havex OPC scanner.

CapLoader 1.2 Transcript of OPC-DA session
Image: CapLoader Transcript of OPC-DA session

Oh yes, the Havex OPC scanner sure received OPC tags from what appears to be a Waterfall unidirectional OPC gateway.

Another way to find scanned OPC tags is to search for a unique tag name, like “Bucket Brigade” in this example.

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Posted by Erik Hjelmvik on Wednesday, 12 November 2014 21:09:00 (UTC/GMT)

Monday, 27 October 2014 11:11:00 (UTC/GMT)

Full Disclosure of Havex Trojans

I did a talk on "SCADA Network Forensics" at the 4SICS conference last week, where I disclosed the results from my analysis of the Havex RAT/backdoor.

The Havex backdoor is developed and used by a hacker group called Dragonfly, who are also known as "Energetic Bear" and "Crouching Yeti". Dragonfly is an APT hacker group, who have been reported to specifically target organizations in the energy sector as well as companies in other ICS sectors such as industrial/machinery, manufacturing and pharmaceutical.

In my 4SICS talk I disclosed a previously unpublished comprehensive view of ICS software that has been trojanized with the Havex backdoor, complete with screenshots, version numbers and checksums.

Dale Petersen, founder of Digital Bond, expressed the following request regarding the lack of public information about the software trojanized with Havex:

If the names of the vendors that unwittingly spread Havex were made public, the wide coverage would likely reach most of the affected asset owners.

Following Dale's request we decided to publish the information presented at 4SICS also in this blog post, in order to reach as many affected asset owners as possible. The information published here is based on our own sandbox executions of Havex malware samples, which we have obtained via CodeAndSec and malwr.com. In addition to what I presented at 4SICS, this blog post also includes new findings published by Joel "scadahacker" Langill in version 2.0 of his Dragonfly white paper, which was released just a couple of hours after my talk.

In Symantec's blog post about Havex they write:

Three different ICS equipment providers were targeted and malware was inserted into the software bundles


Trojanized MESA Imaging driver

The first vendor known to have their software trojanized by the Dragonfly group was the Swiss company MESA Imaging, who manufacture industrial grade cameras for range measurements.


lib MESA SR Installer - SwissrangerSetup1.0.14.706.exe

Image: Screenshot of trojanized MESA Imaging driver installer from our sandbox execution

Company:MESA Imaging
Product:Swiss Ranger version 1.0.14.706 (libMesaSR)
Filename:SwissrangerSetup1.0.14.706.exe
Exposure:Six weeks in June and July 2013 (source: Symantec)
Backdoor:Sysmain RAT
MD5:e027d4395d9ac9cc980d6a91122d2d83
SHA256:398a69b8be2ea2b4a6ed23a55459e0469f657e6c7703871f63da63fb04cefe90

eWON / Talk2M

The second vendor to have their software trojanized was the Belgian company eWON, who provide a remote maintenance service for industrial control systems called “Talk2M”.

eWon published an incident report in January 2014 and then a follow-up report in July 2014 saying:

Back in January 2014, the eWON commercial web site www.ewon.biz had been compromised. A corrupted eCatcherSetup.exe file had been uploaded into the CMS (Content Management System) of www.ewon.biz web site. eCatcher download hyperlinks were rerouted to this corrupted file. The corrupted eCatcherSetup.exe contained a malware which could, under restricted conditions, compromise the Talk2M login of the infected user.

eWON Talk2M eCatcher Installer - eCatcherSetup.exe

Image: Screenshot of trojanized Talk2M eCatcher installer from our sandbox execution

Company:eWON
Product:Talk2M eCatcher version 4.0.0.13073
Filename:eCatcherSetup.exe
Exposure:Ten days in January 2014, 250 copies downloaded (source: Symantec)
Backdoor:Havex 038
MD5:eb0dacdc8b346f44c8c370408bad4306
SHA256:70103c1078d6eb28b665a89ad0b3d11c1cbca61a05a18f87f6a16c79b501dfa9

Prior to version 2.0 of Joel's Dragonfly report, eCatcher was the only product from eWON known to be infected with the Havex backdoor. However, Joel's report also listed a product called “eGrabit”, which we managed to obtain a malware sample for via malwr.com.


eWON eGrabIt Installer - egrabitsetup.exe

Image: Screenshot of trojanized eGrabIt installer from our sandbox execution

Company:eWON
Product:eGrabIt 3.0.0.82 (version 3.0 Build 82)
Filename:egrabitsetup.exe
Exposure:unknown
Backdoor:Havex RAT 038
MD5:1080e27b83c37dfeaa0daaa619bdf478
SHA256:0007ccdddb12491e14c64317f314c15e0628c666b619b10aed199eefcfe09705

MB Connect Line

The most recent company known to have their software infected with the Havex backdoor was the German company MB Connect Line GmbH, who are known for their industrial router mbNET and VPN service mbCONNECT24.

MB Connect Line published a report about the Dragonfly intrusion in September 2014, where they write:

On 16th of April 2014 our website www.mbconnectline.com has been attacked by hackers. The files mbCHECK (Europe), VCOM_LAN2 and mbCONFTOOL have been replaced with infected files. These files were available from 16th of April 2014 to 23th of April 2014 for download from our website. All of these files were infected with the known Trojan Virus Havex Rat.


MB Connect Line mbCONFTOOL setup - setup_1.0.1.exe

Image: Screenshot of trojanized mbCONFTOOL installer from our sandbox execution

Company:MB Connect Line GmbH
Product:mbCONFTOOL V 1.0.1
Filename:setup_1.0.1.exe
Exposure:April 16 to April 23, 2014 (source: MB Connect Line)
Backdoor:Havex RAT 043
MD5:0a9ae7fdcd9a9fe0d8c5c106e8940701
SHA256:c32277fba70c82b237a86e9b542eb11b2b49e4995817b7c2da3ef67f6a971d4a

MB Connect Line mbCHECK - mbCHECK.exe

Image: Screenshot of trojanized mbCHECK application from our sandbox execution

Company:MB Connect Line GmbH
Product:mbCHECK (EUROPE) V 1.1.1
Filename:mbCHECK.exe
Exposure:April 16 to April 23, 2014 (source: MB Connect Line)
Backdoor:Havex RAT 043
MD5:1d6b11f85debdda27e873662e721289e
SHA256:0b74282d9c03affb25bbecf28d5155c582e246f0ce21be27b75504f1779707f5

Notice how only mbCHECK for users in Europe was trojanized, there has been no report of the USA/CAN version of mbCHECK being infected with Havex.

We have not been able to get hold of a malware sample for the trojanized version of VCOM_LAN2. The screenshot below is therefore from a clean version of this software.


MB Connect Line VCOM_LAN2 setup - setupvcom_lan2.exe

Image: Screenshot VCOM_LAN2 installer

Company:MB Connect Line GmbH
Product:VCOM_LAN2
Filename:setupvcom_lan2.exe
Exposure:April 16 to April 23, 2014 (source: MB Connect Line)
Backdoor:unknown
MD5:unknown
SHA256:unknown

Conclusions on Havex Trojans

The vendors who have gotten their software trojanized by Dragonfly are all European ICS companies (Switzerland, Belgium and Germany). Additionally, only the mbCHECK version for users in Europe was infected with Havex, but not the one for US / Canada. These facts indicate that the Dragonfly / Energetic Bear threat actor seems to primarily target ICS companies in Europe.


Next: Detecting Havex with NSM

Read our follow-up blog post Observing the Havex RAT, which shows how to detect and analyze network traffic from ICS networks infected with Havex.

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Posted by Erik Hjelmvik on Monday, 27 October 2014 11:11:00 (UTC/GMT)

Monday, 20 October 2014 13:35:00 (UTC/GMT)

Chinese MITM Attack on iCloud

Users in China are reporting a MITM attacks on SSL connections to iCloud.

GreatFire.org, who monitor the Great Firewall of China (GFW), also published a blog post on their website earlier today saying:

This is clearly a malicious attack on Apple in an effort to gain access to usernames and passwords and consequently all data stored on iCloud such as iMessages, photos, contacts, etc.


Fake SSL Certificate

In their blog post GreatFire also linked a packet capture file, which we have analyzed in order to verify the MITM attack. We loaded the PcapNG file into NetworkMiner Professional and extracted the X.509 SSL certificate.

NetworkMiner with fake iCloud certificate

The extracted certificate can be downloaded from here. Also, here are a few details from this X.509 certificate:

$ openssl x509 -inform DER -in www.icloud.com.cer -noout -issuer -subject -startdate -enddate -fingerprint
issuer= /C=cn/O=www.icloud.com/CN=www.icloud.com
subject= /C=cn/O=www.icloud.com/CN=www.icloud.com
notBefore=Oct 4 10:35:47 2014 GMT
notAfter=Oct 4 10:35:47 2015 GMT
SHA1 Fingerprint=F4:68:B5:F3:FE:D8:07:97:44:76:A2:2B:32:EA:31:37:D9:24:F7:BA

As reported elsewhere, the certificate was self signed, which means that browsers and most iPhone apps will either inform the user about the connection being unsafe or simply close the connection (see update at the bottom of this blog post regarding the missing certificate verification in Apple iOS). This use of self signed certificates is consistent with previous SSL MITM attacks performed in China against GitHub, Google, Yahoo and live.com.


Location of the MITM Attack

By looking at host the information provided by NetworkMiner for the fake iCloud SSL server we can see that it is just six router hops away from the client (having an IP TTL value of 58). This indicates that the MITM attack is being performed within China, since we'd expect to see at least three more router hops if the packets were coming from outside China.

NetworkMiner showing host details for MITM'ed iCloud server

The same PCAP file also contains packets from the same IP address on TCP port 80, which have traveled 11 hops (IP TTL 53). We therefore assume that only traffic to TCP port 443 is being MITM'ed.

This TTL analysis also matches various TCP traceroutes we've seen to the MITM'ed iCloud SSL service on 23.59.94.46:443.

                        My traceroute [v0.85]
siyanmao-k29 (0.0.0.0)                        Sat Oct 18 19:26:07 2014

Host                          Loss% Snt  Last   Avg  Best  Wrst StDev
1. 192.168.1.1                0.0%   17   0.6   0.7   0.6   0.8   0.0
2. -------------              0.0%   16   2.8   2.6   1.7   3.3   0.3
3. -------------              0.0%   16   2.0   2.2   1.4   4.0   0.4
4. ???
5. 119.145.47.78              0.0%   16   6.4   7.7   4.3  27.0   5.2
   183.56.65.54
   183.56.65.50
   119.145.47.74
   121.34.242.250
   121.34.242.138
6. 23.59.94.46               25.0%   16 168.5 171.4 166.8 201.3   9.4
mtr TCP 443 traceroute to 23.59.94.46 (source: http://pastebin.com/8Y6ZwfzG)

bearice@Bearice-Mac-Air-Haswell ~
%tcptraceroute 23.59.94.46 443
Selected device en0, address 192.168.100.16, port 52406 for outgoing packets
Tracing the path to 23.59.94.46 on TCP port 443 (https), 30 hops max
1 192.168.100.254 1.737 ms 0.793 ms 0.798 ms
2 111.192.144.1 2.893 ms 2.967 ms 2.422 ms
3 61.51.246.25 2.913 ms 2.893 ms 3.968 ms
4 124.65.61.157 4.824 ms 2.658 ms 3.902 ms
5 202.96.12.9 3.626 ms 6.532 ms 3.794 ms
6 219.158.96.54 27.539 ms 26.821 ms 27.661 ms
7 a23-59-94-46.deploy.static.akamaitechnologies.com (23.59.94.46) [open] 30.064 ms 29.899 ms 30.126 ms
tcptraceroute to 23.59.94.46 443 (source: bearice on GitHub)

Tcproute by @chenshaoju
Tcproute traceroute to 23.59.94.46 on TCP 443 (source: @chenshaoju)

Judging from these TCP traceroutes the MITM attacks seem to be taking place at several different locations rather centrally in the Chinese Internet infrastructure. To be more specific, it appears as if the MITM attacks are being performed on backbone networks belonging to China Telecom (CHINANET) as well as China Unicom.


UPDATE (October 22)

A vulnerability notice (CVE-2014-4449) has now been published, where Apple confirm that fake SSL certificates (like the Chinese fake one) were not verified by Apple iOS before 8.1. Apple released the first details about this vulnerability just a few hours after this blog post was published. Here's the text from the CVE description:

iCloud Data Access in Apple iOS before 8.1 does not verify X.509 certificates from TLS servers, which allows man-in-the-middle attackers to spoof servers and obtain sensitive information via a crafted certificate.
This means that the Chinese MITM of iCloud could potentially have revealed a significant number of iCloud credentials as well as private data (images, videos, documents etc) to the attackers. Or, as @Exploit_This tweeted: "So china wants our nudes?"

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Posted by Erik Hjelmvik on Monday, 20 October 2014 13:35:00 (UTC/GMT)

Wednesday, 01 October 2014 21:55:00 (UTC/GMT)

Verifying Chinese MITM of Yahoo

Yahoo Umbrella GreatFire.org sent out a tweet yesterday saying that “Yahoo appears to under Man-in-the-middle attack in China. 3rd case of country-wide MITM, after Google, Github”.

Mashable later ran a story called “China Appears to Attack Yahoo in Latest Censorship of Hong Kong Protests”, where Lorenzo Franceschi-Bicchierai write:

In what's almost unprecedented, China appears to be targeting Yahoo with what's called a "man-in-the-middle attack." With such an attack, connections to Yahoo.com, which are normally encrypted, would be vulnerable to snooping, and Chinese censors could also block search terms or specific Yahoo links with the goal of preventing Chinese netizens from accessing information about the protests in Hong Kong.

In this blog post we verify that there is an ongoing Man-in-the-Middle (MITM) attack by analyzing two different packet capture files.

Capture LocationCapture DateFilenameMD5
Wuxi, China 2014-09-30
10:15 (UTC)
Yahoo.pcapng5633a0cce5955b44 18189fe3fd27847d
Zhengzhou, China2014-09-30
11:35 (UTC)
YahooMITM.pcapng722ca9b7837416ef 2391b48edd20d24e

Both PCAP files were created with Wireshark/dumpcap using a capture filter of “host 202.43.192.109”, which is the IP address that was reported to be MITM'ed by the Great Firewall of China (GFW). This IP address is located in Hong Kong and is used by Yahoo to host www.yahoo.com, hk.yahoo.com etc. for users in this part of Asia.


Time-To-Live (TTL) Analysis

We estimate the distance between the end users and the Yahoo server in Hong Kong to be at least 10 router hops. However, the IP packets coming back to the users have IP TTL values of 58 (Wuxi) and 57 (Zhengzhou). This implies that the MITM is performed somewhere in China, just 6 or 7 router hops away from the users. This is consistent with what we've observed in previous MITM attacks performed by China against GitHub and Google.

CapLoader 1.2 Hosts tab with hk.yahoo.com
IMAGE: Hosts tab in CapLoader showing TTL 57 for hk.yahoo.com:443


X.509 Certificate Analysis

We have extracted a X.509 certificate from one of the PcapNG files to a .cer file using NetworkMiner. This SSL certificate is available for download here.

$ openssl x509 -inform DER -in yahoo.com.cer -noout -issuer -subject -startdate -enddate -fingerprint
issuer= /C=cn/O=yahoo.com/CN=yahoo.com
subject= /C=cn/O=yahoo.com/CN=yahoo.com
notBefore=Sep 23 11:30:17 2014 GMT
notAfter=Sep 23 11:30:17 2015 GMT
SHA1 Fingerprint=22:90:C3:11:EA:0F:3F:57:E0:6D:F4:5B:69:8E:18:E8:28:E5:9B:C3

The certificate is a self signed certificate for “yahoo.com”. The fact that the MITM uses a self signed certificate makes the attack easily detectable even for the non-technical user, since the web browser will typically display a warning about the site not being trusted.

Some may think it's odd that China can't forge a properly signed certificate for their SSL MITM attack. However, they've used very similar self signed certificates also in their previous MITM attacks against GitHub and Google. The purpose of GFW (a.k.a. “Golden Shield”) is to censor the Internet, so the primary goal with this MITM attack isn't to covertly spy on Chinese Yahoo searches. Regardless if the end users notice the MITM or not, a self signed X.509 cert is enough in order to see what they are searching for and “kill” their connection to Yahoo when queries like “Umbrella Revolution” and “Tiananmen Square Protests” are observed.

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Posted by Erik Hjelmvik on Wednesday, 01 October 2014 21:55:00 (UTC/GMT)

Thursday, 04 September 2014 23:55:00 (UTC/GMT)

Analysis of Chinese MITM on Google

The Chinese are running a MITM attack on SSL encrypted traffic between Chinese universities and Google. We've performed technical analysis of the attack, on request from GreatFire.org, and can confirm that it is a real SSL MITM against www.google.com and that it is being performed from within China.

We were contacted by GreatFire.org yesterday (September 3) with a request to analyze two packet captures from suspected MITM-attacks before they finalized their blog post. The conclusions from our analysis is now published as part of GreatFire.org's great blog post titled “Authorities launch man-in-the-middle attack on Google”.

In their blog post GreatFire.org write:

From August 28, 2014 reports appeared on Weibo and Google Plus that users in China trying to access google.com and google.com.hk via CERNET, the country’s education network, were receiving warning messages about invalid SSL certificates. The evidence, which we include later in this post, indicates that this was caused by a man-in-the-middle attack.

While the authorities have been blocking access to most things Google since June 4th, they have kept their hands off of CERNET, China’s nationwide education and research network. However, in the lead up to the new school year, the Chinese authorities launched a man-in-the-middle (MITM) attack against Google.

Our network forensic analysis was performed by investigating the following to packet capture files:

Capture LocationClient NetnameCapture DateFilenameMD5
Peking UniversityPKU6-CERNET2Aug 30, 2014google.com.pcapaba4b35cb85ed218 7a8a7656cd670a93
Chongqing UniversityCQU6-CERNET2Sep 1, 2014google_fake.pcapng3bf943ea453f9afa 5c06b9c126d79557


Client and Server IP adresses

The analyzed capture files contain pure IPv6 traffic (CERNET is a IPv6 network) which made the analysis a bit different then usual. We do not disclose the client IP addresses for privacy reasons, but they both seem legit; one from Peking University (netname PKU6-CERNET2) and the other from Chongqing University (CQU6-CERNET2). Both IP addresses belong to AS23910, named "China Next Generation Internet CERNET2".

PekingUniversityPic6 by galaygobi
Peking University entrance, by galaygobi (Creative Commons Attribution 2.0)

CQUAQUGATE3 by Brooktse
Chongqing University gate, by Brooktse (Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0)

The IP addresses received for www.google.com were in both cases also legit, so the MITM wasn't carried out through DNS spoofing. The Peking University client connected to 2607:f8b0:4007:804::1013 (GOOGLE-IPV6 in United States) and the connection from Chongqing University went to 2404:6800:4005:805::1010 (GOOGLE_IPV6_AP-20080930 in Australia).


Time-To-Live (TTL) Analysis

The Time-To-Live (TTL) values received in the IP packets from www.google.com were in both cases 248 or 249 (note: TTL is actually called ”Hop Limit” in IPv6 nomenclature, but we prefer to use the well established term ”TTL” anyway). The highest possible TTL value is 255, this means that the received packets haven't made more than 6 or 7 router hops before ending up at the client. However, the expected number of router hops between a server on GOOGLE-IPV6 and the client at Peking University is around 14. The low number of router hops is is a clear indication of an IP MITM taking place.

CapLoader 1.2, Hosts tab
Image: CapLoader with both capture files loaded, showing TTL values

Here is an IPv6 traceroute from AS25795 in Los Angeles towards the IP address at Peking University (generated with ARP Networks' 4or6.com tool):

#traceroute -6 2001:da8:201:[REDACTED]
 1  2607:f2f8:1600::1 (2607:f2f8:1600::1) 1.636 ms 1.573 ms 1.557 ms
 2  2001:504:13::1a (2001:504:13::1a) 40.381 ms 40.481 ms 40.565 ms
 3  * * *
 4  2001:252:0:302::1 (2001:252:0:302::1) 148.409 ms 148.501 ms 148.595 ms
 5  * * *
 6  2001:252:0:1::1 (2001:252:0:1::1) 148.273 ms 147.620 ms 147.596 ms
 7  pku-bj-v6.cernet2.net (2001:da8:1:1b::2) 147.574 ms 147.619 ms 147.420 ms
 8  2001:da8:1:50d::2 (2001:da8:1:50d::2) 148.582 ms 148.670 ms 148.979 ms
 9  cernet2.net (2001:da8:ac:ffff::2) 147.963 ms 147.956 ms 147.988 ms
10  2001:da8:201:[REDACTED] 147.964 ms 148.035 ms 147.895 ms
11  2001:da8:201:[REDACTED] 147.832 ms 147.881 ms 147.836 ms
12  2001:da8:201:[REDACTED] 147.809 ms 147.707 ms 147.899 ms

As can be seen in the traceroute above, seven hops before the client we find the 2001:252::/32 network, which is called “CNGI International Gateway Network (CNGIIGN)”. This network is actually part of CERNET, but on AS23911, which is the network that connects CERNET with its external peers. A reasonable assumption is therefore that the MITM is carried out on the 2001:252::/32 network, or where AS23910 (2001:da8:1::2) connects to AS23911 (2001:252:0:1::1). This means that the MITM attack is being conducted from within China.


Response Time Analysis

The round-trip time between the client and server can be estimated by measuring the time from when the client sends it initial TCP SYN packet to when it receives a TCP SYN+ACK from the server. The expected round-trip time for connecting from CERNET to a Google server overseas would be around 150ms or more. However, in the captures we've analyzed the TCP SYN+ACK package was received in just 8ms (Peking) and 52ms (Chongqing) respectively. Again, this is a clear indication of an IP MITM taking place, since Google cannot possibly send a response from the US to CERNET within 8ms regardless of how fast they are. The fast response times also indicate that the machine performing the MITM is located fairly close to the network at Peking University.

Even though the machine performing the MITM was very quick at performing the TCP tree-way handshake we noticed that the application layer communication was terribly slow. The specification for the TLS handshake (RFC 2246) defines that a ClientHello message should be responded to with a ServerHello. Google typically send their ServerHello response almost instantly, i.e. the response is received after one round-trip time (150ms in this case). However, in the analyzed captures we noticed ServerHello response times of around 500ms.


X.509 Certificate Analysis

The X.509 certificates were extracted from the two PCAP files to .cer files using NetworkMiner. We noticed that both users received identical certificates, which were both self signed for “google.com”. The fact that the MITM used a self signed certificate makes the attack easily detectable even for the non-technical user, since the web browser will typically display a warning about the site not being trusted. Additionally the X.509 certificate was created for ”google.com” rather than ”*.google.com”. This is an obvious miss from the MITM'ers side since they were attempting to MITM traffic to ”www.google.com” but not to ”google.com”.

NetworkMiner 1.6.1, Files tab
Image: NetworkMiner showing list of X.509 certificates extracted from the two PCAP files

Certificate SHA1 fingerprint: f6beadb9bc02e0a152d71c318739cdecfc1c085d
Certificate MD5 fingerprint: 66:D5:D5:6A:E9:28:51:7C:03:53:C5:E1:33:14:A8:3B

A copy of the fake certificate is available on Google drive thanks to GreatFire.org.


Conclusions

All evidence indicates that a MITM attack is being conducted against traffic between China’s nationwide education and research network CERNET and www.google.com. It looks as if the MITM is carried out on a network belonging to AS23911, which is the outer part of CERNET that peers with all external networks. This network is located in China, so we can conclude that the MITM was being done within the country.

It's difficult to say exactly how the MITM attack was carried out, but we can dismiss DNS spoofing as the used method. The evidence we've observed instead indicate that the MITM attack is performed either by performing IP hijacking or by simply reconfiguring a router to forward the HTTPS traffic to a transparent SSL proxy. An alternative to changing the router config would also be to add an in-line device that redirects the desired traffic to the SSL proxy. However, regardless of how they did it the attacker would be able to decrypt and inspect the traffic going to Google.

We can also conclude that the method used to perform the MITM attack was similar to the Chinese MITM on GitHub, but not identical.

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Posted by Erik Hjelmvik on Thursday, 04 September 2014 23:55:00 (UTC/GMT)

Tuesday, 24 June 2014 21:25:00 (UTC/GMT)

Running NetworkMiner on Mac OS X

Apple Logo

The following is a guest blog post written by Jonas Lejon from the Swedish IT security company Triop, which specialize in crypto, reverse engineering and penetration testing.

This guide describes how to get NetworkMiner running on Mac OS X Mavericks (version 10.9.3).

First of all, download NetworkMiner and then go to the Mono downloads page and get the latest version for Mac OS X:

Mono downloads page

After the download of “Mono MRE installer” has completed, just run the installer:


Mono Framework Installer

Press “Continue” to proceed installing the Mono Framework using the guided installer.

When the Mono Framework has been installed you can extract the downloaded NetworkMiner zip archive. Then start NetworkMiner from the terminal like this:

$ mono NetworkMiner.exe
NetworkMiner 1.6 on Mac OS X - Click To Enlarge
 

Live sniffing with NetworkMiner on Mac OS X

Live sniffing with WinPcap or Raw Sockets is only available when running NetworkMiner in Windows. However, live sniffing can still be achieved on Mac OSX (as well as in Linux) by using the PCAP-over-IP functionality. Simply select [File > Receive PCAP over IP] or press [Ctrl]+R and select a TCP port to listen on (TCP 57012 is the default port).

Pcap-over-IP in NetworkMiner 1.6 on Mac OS X

Press the “Start Receiving” button and then use tcpdump to do live sniffing and forward all captured packets to NetworkMiner like this:

$ sudo tcpdump -i en0 -s0 -U -w - | nc localhost 57012

The preferred way to use NetworkMiner is, however, to load previously captured packets in a PCAP file and let NetworkMiner dig out all interesting details like transmitted files, images, messages, SSL certificates etc.

For more info on how to run NetworkMiner on other operating systems, please see our previous blog posts HowTo install NetworkMiner in Ubuntu Fedora and Arch Linux and No more Wine - NetworkMiner in Linux with Mono.

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Posted by Jonas Lejon on Tuesday, 24 June 2014 21:25:00 (UTC/GMT)

Monday, 16 June 2014 11:00:00 (UTC/GMT)

NetworkMiner 1.6 Released

We've released version 1.6 of NetworkMiner today!

Confetti in Toronto by Winnie Surya Image credits: Confetti in Toronto by Winnie Surya

The new features in NetworkMiner 1.6 include:

  • Drag-and-Drop
    Reassembled files and images can be opened with external tools by drag-and-dropping items from NetworkMiner's Files or Images tabs onto your favorite editor or viewer.

  • Email extraction
    Improved extraction of emails and attachments sent over SMTP.

  • DNS analysis
    Failed DNS lookups that result in NXDOMAIN and SERVFAIL are displayed in the DNS tab along with the flags in the DNS response.

  • Live sniffing
    Improved live sniffing performance.

  • PCAP-over-IP
    Remote live sniffing enabled by bringing the PCAP-over-IP feature into the free open source version of NetworkMiner.


Identifying Malware DNS lookups

NetworkMiner Professional 1.6 with DNS traffic from the Contagio Kuluoz-Asprox

DNS traffic from the Kuluoz-Asprox botnet (PCAP file available via Contagio)

Note the NXDOMAIN responses and “No” in Alexa top 1 million column in the screenshot above; these domains are probably generated by a domain generation algorithm (DGA).

Live Sniffing with Pcap-over-IP

The PCAP-over-IP functionality enables live sniffing also on non-Windows machines, simply by running tcpdump (or dumpcap) and netcat like this:

# tcpdump -i eth0 -s0 -U -w - | nc localhost 57012
For more information about how to run NetworkMiner in Linux, please read our HowTo install NetworkMiner in Ubuntu Fedora and Arch Linux blog post.

To receive the Pcap-over-IP stream in NetworkMiner, simply press Ctrl+R and select a TCP port.

NetworkMiner Pcap-over-IP

For more information about this feature please see our previous blog post about the PCAP‑over‑IP feature.

NetworkMiner Professional

The professional version of NetworkMiner additionally contains the following improvements of the command line tool NetworkMinerCLI:

  • Enabled reading of PCAP and PcapNG data from standard input (STDIN)
  • Full support for PCAP-over-IP
  • More detailed DNS logging in NetworkMinerCLI's CSV export of DNS responses

The ability to read PCAP data from STDIN with NetworkMinerCLI makes it really simple to do live extraction of emails and email attachments. Here's an example showing how to do live SMTP extraction in Linux:

# tcpdump -i eth0 -s0 -w - port 25 or 587 | mono NetworkMinerCLI.exe -r - -w /var/log/smtp_extraction/

The syntax for extracting emails and attachments in Windows is very similar:

C:\>dumpcap.exe -i 1 -f "port 25 or 587" -w - | NetworkMinerCLI.exe -r -

The TCP ports 25 and 587, which are used in the capture filter above, are the standard port numbers for SMTP. In order to do live extraction of files sent over HTTP, simply use “port 80” as capture filter instead. Likewise, X.509 certificates can also be extracted from HTTPS sessions simply by using “port 443” as capture filter.

Download NetworkMiner 1.6

The most recent release of the free (open source) version of NetworkMiner can be downloaded from SourceForge or our NetworkMiner product page. Paying customers can download an update for NetworkMiner Professional from our customer portal.

Credits

We would like to thank Dan Eriksson (FM CERT) and Lenny Hansson (Danish GovCERT) for submitting bug reports and feature requests.

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Posted by Erik Hjelmvik on Monday, 16 June 2014 11:00:00 (UTC/GMT)

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NETRESEC on Twitter

Follow @netresec on twitter:
» twitter.com/netresec


book

Recommended Books

» The Practice of Network Security Monitoring, Richard Bejtlich (2013)

» Applied Network Security Monitoring, Chris Sanders and Jason Smith (2013)

» Network Forensics, Sherri Davidoff and Jonathan Ham (2012)

» The Tao of Network Security Monitoring, Richard Bejtlich (2004)

» Practical Packet Analysis, Chris Sanders (2011)

» Windows Forensic Analysis, Harlan Carvey (2009)

» TCP/IP Illustrated, Volume 1, Kevin Fall and Richard Stevens (2011)

» Industrial Network Security, Eric D. Knapp and Joel Langill (2014)