NETRESEC Network Security Blog

Tuesday, 24 June 2014 21:25:00 (UTC/GMT)

Running NetworkMiner on Mac OS X

Apple Logo

The following is a guest blog post written by Jonas Lejon from the Swedish IT security company Triop, which specialize in crypto, reverse engineering and penetration testing.

This guide describes how to get NetworkMiner running on Mac OS X Mavericks (version 10.9.3).

First of all, download NetworkMiner and then go to the Mono downloads page and get the latest version for Mac OS X:

Mono downloads page

After the download of “Mono MRE installer” has completed, just run the installer:


Mono Framework Installer

Press “Continue” to proceed installing the Mono Framework using the guided installer.

When the Mono Framework has been installed you can extract the downloaded NetworkMiner zip archive. Then start NetworkMiner from the terminal like this:

$ mono NetworkMiner.exe
NetworkMiner 1.6 on Mac OS X - Click To Enlarge
 

Live sniffing with NetworkMiner on Mac OS X

Live sniffing with WinPcap or Raw Sockets is only available when running NetworkMiner in Windows. However, live sniffing can still be achieved on Mac OSX (as well as in Linux) by using the PCAP-over-IP functionality. Simply select [File > Receive PCAP over IP] or press [Ctrl]+R and select a TCP port to listen on (TCP 57012 is the default port).

Pcap-over-IP in NetworkMiner 1.6 on Mac OS X

Press the “Start Receiving” button and then use tcpdump to do live sniffing and forward all captured packets to NetworkMiner like this:

$ sudo tcpdump -i en0 -s0 -U -w - | nc localhost 57012

The preferred way to use NetworkMiner is, however, to load previously captured packets in a PCAP file and let NetworkMiner dig out all interesting details like transmitted files, images, messages, SSL certificates etc.

For more info on how to run NetworkMiner on other operating systems, please see our previous blog posts HowTo install NetworkMiner in Ubuntu Fedora and Arch Linux and No more Wine - NetworkMiner in Linux with Mono.

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Posted by Jonas Lejon on Tuesday, 24 June 2014 21:25:00 (UTC/GMT)

Monday, 16 June 2014 11:00:00 (UTC/GMT)

NetworkMiner 1.6 Released

We've released version 1.6 of NetworkMiner today!

Confetti in Toronto by Winnie Surya Image credits: Confetti in Toronto by Winnie Surya

The new features in NetworkMiner 1.6 include:

  • Drag-and-Drop
    Reassembled files and images can be opened with external tools by drag-and-dropping items from NetworkMiner's Files or Images tabs onto your favorite editor or viewer.

  • Email extraction
    Improved extraction of emails and attachments sent over SMTP.

  • DNS analysis
    Failed DNS lookups that result in NXDOMAIN and SERVFAIL are displayed in the DNS tab along with the flags in the DNS response.

  • Live sniffing
    Improved live sniffing performance.

  • PCAP-over-IP
    Remote live sniffing enabled by bringing the PCAP-over-IP feature into the free open source version of NetworkMiner.


Identifying Malware DNS lookups

NetworkMiner Professional 1.6 with DNS traffic from the Contagio Kuluoz-Asprox

DNS traffic from the Kuluoz-Asprox botnet (PCAP file available via Contagio)

Note the NXDOMAIN responses and “No” in Alexa top 1 million column in the screenshot above; these domains are probably generated by a domain generation algorithm (DGA).

Live Sniffing with Pcap-over-IP

The PCAP-over-IP functionality enables live sniffing also on non-Windows machines, simply by running tcpdump (or dumpcap) and netcat like this:

# tcpdump -i eth0 -s0 -U -w - | nc localhost 57012
For more information about how to run NetworkMiner in Linux, please read our HowTo install NetworkMiner in Ubuntu Fedora and Arch Linux blog post.

To receive the Pcap-over-IP stream in NetworkMiner, simply press Ctrl+R and select a TCP port.

NetworkMiner Pcap-over-IP

For more information about this feature please see our previous blog post about the PCAP‑over‑IP feature.

NetworkMiner Professional

The professional version of NetworkMiner additionally contains the following improvements of the command line tool NetworkMinerCLI:

  • Enabled reading of PCAP and PcapNG data from standard input (STDIN)
  • Full support for PCAP-over-IP
  • More detailed DNS logging in NetworkMinerCLI's CSV export of DNS responses

The ability to read PCAP data from STDIN with NetworkMinerCLI makes it really simple to do live extraction of emails and email attachments. Here's an example showing how to do live SMTP extraction in Linux:

# tcpdump -i eth0 -s0 -w - port 25 or 587 | mono NetworkMinerCLI.exe -r - -w /var/log/smtp_extraction/

The syntax for extracting emails and attachments in Windows is very similar:

C:\>dumpcap.exe -i 1 -f "port 25 or 587" -w - | NetworkMinerCLI.exe -r -

The TCP ports 25 and 587, which are used in the capture filter above, are the standard port numbers for SMTP. In order to do live extraction of files sent over HTTP, simply use “port 80” as capture filter instead. Likewise, X.509 certificates can also be extracted from HTTPS sessions simply by using “port 443” as capture filter.

Download NetworkMiner 1.6

The most recent release of the free (open source) version of NetworkMiner can be downloaded from SourceForge or our NetworkMiner product page. Paying customers can download an update for NetworkMiner Professional from our customer portal.

Credits

We would like to thank Dan Eriksson (FM CERT) and Lenny Hansson (Danish GovCERT) for submitting bug reports and feature requests.

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Posted by Erik Hjelmvik on Monday, 16 June 2014 11:00:00 (UTC/GMT)

Thursday, 01 May 2014 21:45:00 (UTC/GMT)

PCAP or it didn't happen

The phrase "PCAP or it didn't happen" is often used in the network security field when someone want proof that an attack or compromise has taken place. One such example is the recent OpenSSL heartbleed vulnerability, where some claim that the vulnerability was known and exploited even before it was discovered by Google's Neel Mehta and Codenomicon.

PCAP or it didn't happen pwnie, original by Nina on http://n924.deviantart.com
Image: PCAP or it didn't happen pwnie, original by Nina

After the Heartbleed security advisory was published, EFF tweeted:

"Anyone reproduced observations of #Heartbleed attacks from 2013?"
and Liam Randall (of Bro fame) tweeted:
"If someone finds historical exploits of #Heartbleed I hope they can report it. Lot's of sites mining now."

Liam Randall (@Hectaman) tweeting about historical Heartbleed searchesHeartbleed

It is unfortunately not possible to identify Heartbleed attacks by analyzing log files, as stated by the following Q&A from the heartbleed.com website:

Can I detect if someone has exploited this against me?

Exploitation of this bug does not leave any trace of anything abnormal happening to the logs.

Additionally, IDS  signatures  for detecting the Heartbleed attacks weren't available until after implementations of the exploit code were being actively used in the wild.

Hence, the only reliable way of detecting early heartbleed attacks (i.e. prior to April 7) is to analyze old captured network traffic from before April 7. In order to do this you should have had a full packet capture running, which was configured to capture and store all your traffic. Unfortunately many companies and organizations haven't yet realized the value that historical packet captures can provide.

Why Full Packet Capture Matters

Some argue that just storing netflow data is enough in order to do incident response. However, detecting events like the heartbleed attack is impossible to do with netflow since you need to verify the contents of the network traffic.

Not only is retaining historical full packet captures useful in order to detect attacks that have taken place in the past, it is also extremely valuable to have in order to do any of the following:

  • IDS Verification
    Investigate IDS alerts to see if they were false positives or real attacks.

  • Post Exploitation Analysis
    Analyze network traffic from a compromise to see what the attacker did after hacking into a system.

  • Exfiltration Analysis
    Assess what intellectual property that has been exfiltrated by an external attacker or insider.

  • Network Forensics
    Perform forensic analysis of a suspect's network traffic by extracting files, emails, chat messages, images etc.

Setting up a Full Packet Capture

netsniff-ng logo

The first step, when deploying a full packet capture (FPC) solution, is to install a network tap or configure a monitor port in order to get a copy of all packets going in and out from your networks. Then simply sniff the network traffic with a tool like dumpcap or netsniff-ng. Another alternative is to deploy a whole network security monitoring (NSM) infrastructure, preferably by installing the SecurityOnion Linux distro.

A network sniffer will eventually run out of disk, unless captured network traffic is written to disk in a rung buffer manner (use "-b files" switch in dumpcap) or there is a scheduled job in place to remove the oldest capture files. SecurityOnion, for example, normally runs its "cleandisk" cronjob when disk utilization reaches 90%.

The ratio between disk space and utilized bandwidth becomes the maximum retention period for full packet data. We recommend having a full packet capture retention period of at least 7 days, but many companies and organizations are able to store several month's worth of network traffic (disk is cheap).

Big Data PCAP Analysis

Okay, you've got a PCAP store with multiple terabytes of data. Then what? How do you go about analyzing such large volumes of captured full content network traffic? Well, tasks like indexing and analyzing PCAP data is more complex matters than what can be covered in this blog post. We've covered the big data PCAP analysis topic in previous  blog posts, and there is more to come. However, capturing the packets to disk is a crucial first step in order to utilize the powers of network forensics. Or as the saying goes “PCAP or it didn't happen”.

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Posted by Erik Hjelmvik on Thursday, 01 May 2014 21:45:00 (UTC/GMT)

Wednesday, 02 April 2014 13:15:00 (UTC/GMT)

Keyword Search in PCAP files

Sherlock Holmes and Magnifying Glass via Inside Croydon A new function in the free version of CapLoader 1.2 is the "Find Keyword" feature. This keyword search functionality makes it possible to seek large capture files for a string or byte pattern super fast!

You might say, so what? PCAP string search can already be done with tools like tcpflow, ngrep and even Wireshark; what's the benefit of adding yet another tool to this list? One benefit is that CapLoader doesn't just give you the packet or content that matched the keyword, it will instead extract the whole TCP or UDP flow that contained the match. CapLoader also supports many different encodings, which is demonstrated in this blog post.

Here are a few quick wins with CapLoader's keyword search feature:

  • Track User-Agent - Search for a specific user agent string to extract all the HTTP traffic from a particular browser or malware.
  • Track Domain Name - Search for a particular domain name to get all DNS lookups as well as web traffic relating to that domain (including HTTP "referer" field matches).
  • Extract Messages - Search for a keyword in e-mail or chat traffic to get the whole e-mail or conversation, not just the single packet that matched.
  • Extract Files - Search for a unique string or byte sequence in a file (such as a piece of malware) to enable extraction of the complete file transfer.

EXAMPLE: DigitalCorpora M57

As an example, let's search the digital corpora file net-2009-12-06-11:59.pcap (149 MB) for the keyword "immortal". Follow these steps in order to veify our analysis using the free edition of CapLoader.

  1. Start CapLoader and select File -> Open URL, enter:
    http://digitalcorpora.org/corp/nps/scenarios/2009-m57-patents/net/net-2009-12-06-11:59.pcap.gz
  2. Edit -> Find Keyword (or Ctrl+F), enter "immortal" CapLoader Find Keyword Form
  3. Click the "Find and Select All Matching Flows" button
  4. One TCP flow is now selected (Flow_ID 5469, 192.168.1.104:2592 -> 192.168.1.1:25) CapLoader with one selected flow
  5. Right click the selected flow (ID 5469) and select "Flow Transcript"
CapLoader Flow Transcript of SMTP email attachment

CapLoader transcript of SMTP email flow

Looks as if an email has been sent with an attachment named "microscope1.jpg". However, the string "immortal" cannot be seen anywhere in the transcript view. The match that CapLoader found was actually in the contents of the attachment, which has been base64 encoded in the SMTP transfer in accordance with RFC 2045 (MIME).

The email attachment can easily be extracted from the PCAP file using NetworkMiner. However, to keep things transparent, let's just do a simple manual verification of the matched data. The first three lines of the email attachment are:

/9j/4AAQSkZJRgABAQEAkACQAAD/2wBDAAEBAQEBAQEBAQEBAQEBAQEBAQEBAQEBAQEBAQEB
AQEBAQEBAQEBAQEBAQEBAQEBAQEBAQEBAQEBAQEBAQEBAQH/2wBDAQEBAQEBAQEBAQEBAQEB
AQEBAQEBAQEBAQEBAQEBAQEBAQFwYXNzd29yZD1pbW1vcnRhbAEBAQEBAQEBAQEBAQH/wAAR
Decoding this with base64 gives us:
0000000: ffd8 ffe0 0010 4a46 4946 0001 0101 0090 ......JFIF......
0000010: 0090 0000 ffdb 0043 0001 0101 0101 0101 .......C........
0000020: 0101 0101 0101 0101 0101 0101 0101 0101 ................
0000030: 0101 0101 0101 0101 0101 0101 0101 0101 ................
0000040: 0101 0101 0101 0101 0101 0101 0101 0101 ................
0000050: 0101 0101 0101 0101 01ff db00 4301 0101 ............C...
0000060: 0101 0101 0101 0101 0101 0101 0101 0101 ................
0000070: 0101 0101 0101 0101 0101 0101 0101 0101 ................
0000080: 7061 7373 776f 7264 3d69 6d6d 6f72 7461 password=immorta
0000090: 6c01 0101 0101 0101 0101 0101 0101 ffc0 l...............

Tools like ngrep, tcpflow and Wireshark won't find any match for the string "immortal" since they don't support searching in base64 encoded data. CapLoader, on the other hand, supports lots of encodings.

Supported Text Encodings

CapLoader currently supports fast searching of text strings in any of the following encodings:

  • ASCII
  • Base64 (used in email attachments and HTTP POST's)
  • DNS label encoding (RFC 1035)
  • HTML
  • Quoted Printable (used in body of email messages)
  • Unicode
  • URL encoding
  • UTF8

CapLoader also supports several local character sets, including the following code pages:

  • 437 MS-DOS Latin US
  • 850 MS-DOS Latin 1
  • 932 Japanese
  • 936 Simplified Chinese
  • 949 Korean
  • 1251 Windows Cyrillic (Slavic)
  • 1256 Windows Arabic

Having all these encodings also makes it possible to search network traffic for words like хакер, القراصنة, ハッカー, 黑客 or 해커.

The Art of War by Sun Tzu

Getting CapLoader

CapLoader is a commercial tool that also comes in a free trial edition. The search feature is available in both versions, so feel free to download CapLoader and try it your self!

CapLoader is available from the following URL:
http://www.netresec.com/?page=CapLoader

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Posted by Erik Hjelmvik on Wednesday, 02 April 2014 13:15:00 (UTC/GMT)

Monday, 17 March 2014 10:05:00 (UTC/GMT)

Carving Network Packets from Memory Dump Files

Hattori Hanzo by Stefan Ledwina A new feature in the recently released CapLoader 1.2 is the ability to carve network packets from any file and save them in the PCAP-NG format. This fusion between memory forensics and network forensics makes it possible to extract sent and received IP frames, with complete payload, from RAM dumps as well as from raw disk images.

CapLoader will basically carve any TCP or UDP packet that is preceded by an IP frame (both IPv4 and IPv6 are supported), and believe me; there are quite a few such packets in a normal memory image!

We've made the packet carver feature available in the free version of CapLoader, so feel free to give it a try!

The packet carving feature makes it possible do much better analysis of network traffic in memory dumps compared to Volatility's connscan2. With Volatility you basically get the IP addresses and port numbers that communicated, but with CapLoader's packet carver you also get the contents of the communication!

Modern depiction of ninja with ninjato (ninja sword), Edo wonderland, Japan

EXAMPLE: Honeynet Banking Troubles Image

I loaded the publicly available “Banking Troubles” memory image from the Honeynet Project into CapLoader to exemplify the packet carver's usefulness in a digital forensics / incident response (DFIR) scenario.

CapLoader 1.2 Carving Packets from HoneyNet Memory Image
CapLoader 1.2 Carving Packets from HoneyNet Memory Image

CapLoader 1.2 Finished Carving Packets from HoneyNet Memory Image
22 TCP/UDP Flows were carved from the memory image by CapLoader

Let's look at the network traffic information that was extracted in the Honeynet Project's own solution for the Banking Troubles Challenge:

python volatility connscan2 -f images/hn_forensics.vmem"
Local Address Remote Address Pid
------------------------- ------------------------- ------
192.168.0.176:1176 212.150.164.203:80 888
192.168.0.176:1189 192.168.0.1:9393 1244
192.168.0.176:2869 192.168.0.1:30379 1244
192.168.0.176:2869 192.168.0.1:30380 4
0.0.0.0:0 80.206.204.129:0 0
127.0.0.1:1168 127.0.0.1:1169 888
192.168.0.176:1172 66.249.91.104:80 888
127.0.0.1:1169 127.0.0.1:1168 888
192.168.0.176:1171 66.249.90.104:80 888
192.168.0.176:1178 212.150.164.203:80 1752
192.168.0.176:1184 193.104.22.71:80 880
192.168.0.176:1185 193.104.22.71:80 880

[...]

"This connection [marked in bold above] was opened by AcroRd32.exe (PID 1752) and this represents an additional clue that an Adobe Reader exploit was used in order to download and execute a malware sample."

The solution doesn't provide any evidence regarding what Acrobat Reader actually used the TCP connection for. Additionally, none of the three finalists managed to prove what was sent over this connection.

To view the payload of this TCP connection in CapLoader, I simply right-clicked the corresponding row and selected “Flow Transcript”.

Transcript of TCP flow contents in CapLoader
Transcript of TCP flow contents (much like Wireshark's Follow-TCP-Stream)

We can see that the following was sent from 192.168.0.176 to 212.150.164.203:

GET /load.php?a=a&st=Internet%20Explorer%206.0&e=2 HTTP/1.1
Accept: */*
Accept-Encoding: gzip, deflate
User-Agent: Mozilla/4.0 (compatible; MSIE 6.0; Windows NT 5.1; SV1)
Host: search-network-plus.com
Connection: Keep-Alive

Notice that the HTTP GET request took place at the end of the TCP session. Odd? Well, CapLoader doesn't know the timestamp of carved packets, so they are simply ordered as they were discovered in the dump file. The timestamp generated for each carved packet represents where in the image/dump the packet was found. Or more precise: the number of microseconds since EPOCH (1970-01-01 00:00:00) is the offset (in bytes) from where the packet was carved.

Hence, we know that the HTTP GET request can be found between offset 37068800 and 37507072 in the image (a 428 kB region). To be more exact we can open the generated PcapNG file with Wireshark or Tshark to get the timestamp and length of the actual HTTP GET request packet.

tshark.exe -r Bob.vmem.pcapng" -R http.request -T fields -e frame.time_epoch -e frame.len -e http.request.uri
31.900664000 175 *
37.457920000 175 *
37.462016000 286 /load.php?a=a&st=Internet%20Explorer%206.0&e=2
37.509120000 175 *
37.519360000 245 /~produkt/983745213424/34650798253
37.552128000 266 /root.sxml
37.570560000 265 /l3fw.xml
37.591040000 274 /WANCommonIFC1.xml
37.607424000 271 /WANIPConn1.xml

Now, lets verify that the raw packet data is actually 37462016 bytes into the memory dump.

xxd -s 37462016 -l 286 Bob.vmem
23ba000: 0021 9101 b248 000c 2920 d71e 0800 4500 .!...H..) ....E.
23ba010: 0110 3113 4000 8006 8e1a c0a8 00b0 d496 ..1.@...........
23ba020: a4cb 049a 0050 7799 0550 f33b 7886 5018 .....Pw..P.;x.P.
23ba030: faf0 227e 0000 4745 5420 2f6c 6f61 642e .."~..GET /load.
23ba040: 7068 703f 613d 6126 7374 3d49 6e74 6572 php?a=a&st=Inter
23ba050: 6e65 7425 3230 4578 706c 6f72 6572 2532 net%20Explorer%2
23ba060: 3036 2e30 2665 3d32 2048 5454 502f 312e 06.0&e=2 HTTP/1.
23ba070: 310d 0a41 6363 6570 743a 202a 2f2a 0d0a 1..Accept: */*..
23ba080: 4163 6365 7074 2d45 6e63 6f64 696e 673a Accept-Encoding:
23ba090: 2067 7a69 702c 2064 6566 6c61 7465 0d0a gzip, deflate..
23ba0a0: 5573 6572 2d41 6765 6e74 3a20 4d6f 7a69 User-Agent: Mozi
23ba0b0: 6c6c 612f 342e 3020 2863 6f6d 7061 7469 lla/4.0 (compati
23ba0c0: 626c 653b 204d 5349 4520 362e 303b 2057 ble; MSIE 6.0; W
23ba0d0: 696e 646f 7773 204e 5420 352e 313b 2053 indows NT 5.1; S
23ba0e0: 5631 290d 0a48 6f73 743a 2073 6561 7263 V1)..Host: searc
23ba0f0: 682d 6e65 7477 6f72 6b2d 706c 7573 2e63 h-network-plus.c
23ba100: 6f6d 0d0a 436f 6e6e 6563 7469 6f6e 3a20 om..Connection:
23ba110: 4b65 6570 2d41 6c69 7665 0d0a 0d0a Keep-Alive....
Yep, that's our HTTP GET packet preceded by an Ethernet, IP and TCP header.

Ninja Training by Danny Choo

Give it a Try!

Wanna verify the packet carving functionality? Well, that's easy! Just follow these three steps:

  1. Download a sample memory image (thanks for the great resource Volatility Team!)
     OR
    Download the free RAM dumper DumpIt and dump your own computer's memory.
     OR
    Locate an existing file that already contains parts of your RAM, such as pagefile.sys or hiberfil.sys

  2. Download the free version of CapLoader and open the memory dump.

  3. Select destination for the generated PcapNG file with carved packets and hit the “Carve” button!

Illangam fighting scene with swords and shields at korathota angampora tradition

Carving Packets from Proprietary and odd Capture Formats

CapLoader can parse PCAP and PcapNG files, which are the two most widely used packet capture formats. However, the packet carving features makes it possible to extract packets from pretty much any capture format, including proprietary ones. The drawback is that timestamp information will be lost.

We have successfully verified that CapLaoder can carve packets from the following network packet capture / network trace file formats:

  • .CAP files created with Microsoft Network Monitor
  • .ENC files (NA Sniffer) from IBM ISS products like the Proventia IPS (as well as Robert Graham's old BlackICE)
  • .ERF files from Endace probes

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Posted by Erik Hjelmvik on Monday, 17 March 2014 10:05:00 (UTC/GMT)

Wednesday, 12 March 2014 14:45:00 (UTC/GMT)

Search and Carve Packets with CapLoader 1.2

CapLoader LogoCapLoader version 1.2 was released today, with lots of new powerful features.

The most significant additions in CapLaoder 1.2 are:

  • Network packet carving, i.e. the ability to carve full content network packets from RAM dumps, disk images etc.
  • Flows can be hidden/filtered in the user interface.
  • Full content keyword search in capture files.
  • Flow can be selected based on TCP flags.
  • Better handling of broken and corrupt capture files.
What's really cool is that all these new features are available in the free version of CapLoader!

Nikon Microscope by windy_

In addition to these updates, customers using the commercial edition of CapLoader also get an updated protocol database. This update improves the Port Independent Protocol Identification (PIPI) feature in CapLoader with more protocols and better accuracy. Not only does this help analysts detect services like SSH, FTP and HTTP running on non-standard ports, but the protocol database also includes signatures for malware and APT C2 traffic like ZeroAccess, Zeus, Gh0st RAT and Poison Ivy RAT.

An update for CapLoader to version 1.2 is available for previous customers via our customer portal.

The free trial version of CapLoader can be downloaded from http://www.netresec.com/?page=CapLoader

CapLoader 1.2 with Transcript window
CapLoader 1.2 with suspect.pcap (from DFRWS 2008) loaded and Transcript window open

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Posted by Erik Hjelmvik on Wednesday, 12 March 2014 14:45:00 (UTC/GMT)

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book

Recommended Books

» The Practice of Network Security Monitoring, Richard Bejtlich (2013)

» Applied Network Security Monitoring, Chris Sanders and Jason Smith (2013)

» Network Forensics, Sherri Davidoff and Jonathan Ham (2012)

» The Tao of Network Security Monitoring, Richard Bejtlich (2004)

» Practical Packet Analysis, Chris Sanders (2011)

» Windows Forensic Analysis, Harlan Carvey (2009)

» TCP/IP Illustrated, Volume 1, Kevin Fall and Richard Stevens (2011)


Recommended Mags

eForensics Mag