NETRESEC Network Security Blog - Tag : JA3S

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Emotet C2 and Spam Traffic Video

This video covers a life cycle of an Emotet infection, including initial infection, command-and-control traffic, and spambot activity sending emails with malicious spreadsheet attachments to infect new victims.

The video was recorded in a Windows Sandbox in order to avoid accidentally infecting my Windows PC with malware.

Initial Infection

Palo Alto's Unit 42 sent out a tweet with screenshots and IOCs from an Emotet infection in early March. A follow-up tweet by Brad Duncan linked to a PCAP file containing network traffic from the infection on Malware-Traffic-Analysis.net.

Screenshot of original infection email from Unit 42

Image: Screenshot of original infection email from Unit 42

  • Attachment MD5: 825e8ea8a9936eb9459344b941df741a

Emotet Download

The PCAP from Malware-Traffic-Analysis.net shows that the Excel spreadsheet attachment caused the download of a DLL file classified as Emotet.

CapLoader download of Emotet DLL from diacrestgroup.com

Image: CapLoader transcript of Emotet download

  • DNS: diacrestgroup.com
  • MD5: 99f59e6f3fa993ba594a3d7077cc884d

Emotet Command-and-Control

Just seconds after the Emotet DLL download completes the victim machine starts communicating with an IP address classified as a botnet command-and-control server.

Emotet C2 sessions with JA3 51c64c77e60f3980eea90869b68c58a8 in CapLoader

Image: Emotet C2 sessions in CapLoader

  • C2 IP: 209.15.236.39
  • C2 IP: 147.139.134.226
  • C2 IP: 134.209.156.68
  • JA3: 51c64c77e60f3980eea90869b68c58a8
  • JA3S: ec74a5c51106f0419184d0dd08fb05bc
  • JA3S: fd4bc6cea4877646ccd62f0792ec0b62

Emotet Spambot

The victim PC eventually started sending out spam emails. The spam bot used TLS encryption when possible, either through SMTPS (implicit TLS) or with help of STARTTLS (explicit TLS).

Emotet spambot JA3 hash 37cdab6ff1bd1c195bacb776c5213bf2 in NetworkMiner Professional

Image: Emotet spambot JA3 hash in NetworkMiner Professional

  • SMTPS JA3: 37cdab6ff1bd1c195bacb776c5213bf2
  • STARTTLS JA3: 37cdab6ff1bd1c195bacb776c5213bf2

Transmitted Spam

Below is a spam email sent from the victim PC without TLS encryption. The attached zip file contains a malicious Excel spreadsheet, which is designed to infect new victims with Emotet.

Emotet spam email from PCAP

Image: Spam email extracted from Emotet PCAP with NetworkMiner

  • .zip Attachment MD5: 5df1c719f5458035f6be2a071ea831db
  • .xlsm Attachment MD5: 79cb3df6c0b7ed6431db76f990c68b5b

Network Forensics Training

If you want to learn additional techniques for analyzing network traffic, then take a look at our upcoming network forensic trainings.

Posted by Erik Hjelmvik on Monday, 09 May 2022 06:50:00 (UTC/GMT)

Tags: #Emotet#C2#video#pcap#JA3#JA3S#SMTP#SMTPS#Windows Sandbox

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NetworkMiner 2.7 Released

NetworkMiner 2.7 Logo

We are happy to announce the release of NetworkMiner 2.7 today! The new version extracts documents from print traffic and pulls out even more files and parameters from HTTP as well as SMB2 traffic. We have also updated our JA3 implementation to fingerprint the server side in TLS sessions using JA3S hashes and added a few tweaks to the user interface to better identify the extension of extracted files.

Extraction of Printed Data

NetworkMiner 2.7 can extract documents from LPR/LPD print traffic on TCP 515 (RFC1179). The extracted print data is saved to disk as .prn files, which can be analyzed with tools like PCL Paraphernalia. The professional version of NetworkMiner also comes with a carver that attempts to extract PostScript and PDF files from print traffic.

Improved File Extraction from PCAP

One of the premier features of NetworkMiner is its ability to extract transferred files from network traffic. We have fine tuned NetworkMiner’s file extraction code for SMB2 as well as HTTP POST in this release, in order to retrieve as much information as possible from these protocols. We’ve also added more granular logging of SMB2 requests and responses to the Parameters tab.

More DNS Types Supported

NetworkMiner 2.7 now parses DNS TXT and SRV resource records, which are displayed in NetworkMiner’s DNS tab. The TXT records can be used for almost anything, but the SRV records are used to map service types to the hostnames that provide that service. SRV lookups are often used in order to locate the domain controller on a network by querying for “_ldap._tcp.dc._msdcs.<DOMAIN>”.

DNS SRV and TXT records in NetworkMiner

DNS SRV of lookups are performed by malware and attackers as well as for legitimate reasons, even though attackers sometimes make mistakes that can be used for detection or threat hunting.

TLS Server Fingerprinting with JA3S

We introduced TLS client fingerprinting using JA3 hashes in NetworkMiner 2.5. We have now also added support for JA3S hashes, which is a method for fingerprinting the server side of a TLS connection. The JA3S hashes are extracted from the “Server Hello” TLS packets and shown on NetworkMiner’s Parameters tab as well as in the Host Details of the server. We have also improved how NetworkMiner displays the JA3 hashes in the Host Details view.

JA3S hashes in NetworkMiner

Additional User Interface Improvements

Double clicking on an extracted file in NetworkMiner's Files tab now brings up the File Details window. We’ve extended this window to also include a simple hex viewer and a feature that attempts to identify the file type based on the reassembled file’s header.

NetworkMiner's File Details window with hex viewer

The file type identification feature is also used in order to provide more accurate file extensions to extracted files, such as “.exe” or “.zip”, instead of the “.octet-stream” that you’d often see in previous versions of NetworkMiner. We have added a warning dialogue to NetworkMiner 2.7 that shows up if a user tries to run an executable file directly from the NetworkMiner GUI.

Warning dialogue in NetworkMiner when opening executable file

NetworkMiner Professional

Our commercial tool NetworkMiner Professional has received a few additional updates. It can, for example, carve PDF and PostScript files from extracted LPR print data. We have also added several OSINT services, such as ANY.RUN, MalwareBazaar, URLHaus and ThreatFox, for performing lookups of file hashes. The OSINT context menu is opened by right-clicking an extracted file in NetworkMiner Professional.

GPS data stored in pcap-ng option fields, typically by Kismet, is now extracted as capture file metadata. Right-click a capture file and select "Show Metadata" to show the coordinates from Kismet. We have also re-implemented the support for a PCAP-over-IP listener in NetworkMinerCLI, which is the command line version of NetworkMiner Pro. This feature allows the command line tool to receive PCAP data over a TCP socket instead of reading from a capture file. The PCAP-over-IP listener feature was previously broken in NetworkMinerCLI.

Credits

We’d like to thank Hayo Brouwer (of Ricoh) for requesting the LPR extraction feature and providing capture files for testing, Jeff Rivett for reporting a 64 bit issue with WinPcap/Npcap and Ali Mohd for reporting the broken PCAP-over-IP listener feature.

Upgrading to Version 2.7

Users who have purchased NetworkMiner Professional can download a free update to version 2.7 from our customer portal, or use the “Help > Check for Updates” feature. Those who instead prefer to use the free and open source version can grab the latest version of NetworkMiner from the official NetworkMiner page.

Posted by Erik Hjelmvik on Tuesday, 15 June 2021 11:55:00 (UTC/GMT)

Tags: #NetworkMiner#PCAP#SMB2#JA3#JA3S#OSINT

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